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Sorry boss, I can't work today, fucking Intellij is indexing again.

Comments
  • 10
    That's an interesting way to say "I need a new computer".
  • 8
    @kamen Or really, just an SSD
  • 1
    @Drunkzee and/or a better CPU and/or more RAM. Office PCs often contain the cheapest of components - like a Celeron CPU paired with 4 to 8 GiB GiB of RAM sharing the case with a 5400 RPM spinning rust drive - all powered by a PSU that barely manages to survive the disk spinup.

    There really is no honour amongst the thieves that sell "office PCs"...
  • 1
    @Oktokolo Especially painful, when you do mobile development and has to run the emulator along the heavy IDE and even worst when you dsont have a test server for your .NET backend application to you have to run that local as well in visual studio.

    Pure pain and torture.
  • 1
    I've got a macbook pro, brand new two years ago. I don't think it should need replacement already.
  • 3
    @Frederick You should always test locally if possible - even if there also is a test server. And if the workstation isn't beefy enough, you need an upgrade.

    For software development, 16 GiB RAM and an i7 class CPU are the minimum and should enable you to run multiple IDEs, docker, clound/phone emulators and a browsers in parallel. But more RAM is always better and 32 GiB should actually be the norm by now.
  • 1
    @Oktokolo Ohhh i dont disagree with that all, it was more the scenario of why shitty PCs dont cut it.
  • 0
    @AmbientTea I do not think you should need a new pc either. What I do think is that some of the other homies in here did not get the joke
  • 0
    @Oktokolo cpu brand doesn't really tell anything about performance. An i7 may be slower than a celeron of the same generation.
  • 0
    IDEA on my 4-year-old (but well-spec'd at the time) personal laptop working on my personal passion project that is FAR more complex than anything I do at work...

    ...runs like a dream. Does exactly what I tell it to exactly when I tell it to do it, fast, no lag, and that's with almost every plugin under the soon installed and enabled.

    IDEA (with as few plugins as possible enabled) on my who-the-fuck-knows-how-old-at-this-point (but not actually terribly spec'd, on paper, anyway) work laptop working on my main project that, while not simple, isn't anything monstrous...

    ...like being stuck at the event horizon of a black hole to an outside observer. AARRGGHH!!!!
  • 0
    @electrineer Back then when i bought my current main PC, the tiers where pretty clearly ordered performance-wise. As long as you didn't go for the lowpower models, celerons where slower than i3, which where slower than i5, which where slower than i7 (i9, Zen or Ryzen didn't exist).

    There was some overlap between the low and high ends of touching consumer CPU tiers - but it wasn't as extreme as having any celeron outperforming the higher end of i3 or any lower end of any higher tier. Wonder whether Intel actually botched their product lineup that hard since then...
  • 0
    @Oktokolo there are many power target tiers and even the same chip can run with different power budget depending on the device it runs in. To make matters worse, thermal throttling can change which cpu is the fastest in the same system.
  • 0
    @electrineer I just assumed cooling, board and PSU matching the CPU. Also assumed non-botched assembly of the PC and comparable power saving settings.
  • 0
    @Oktokolo non-botched product can be hard to find
  • 0
    @electrineer That is why i do the research before buying components and assemble the PC myself. The result is definitely worth the time investment.
  • 0
    @Oktokolo yeah, and to get back to my original point: the branding isn't helpful
  • 0
    @Oktokolo I do disagree with that statement. Remote debugging + sftp is a thing. Some setups benefit from that (like dev/test more similar to Pro). The experience can be the same (or at least very similar) as local
  • 1
    @hjk101 In my experience, it was always easier to to test locally first. Sure, if you have proper devops, there should be a server where devs can remotely test their branches independently from each other while developing and before merging into the common development branch. That never was the case where i worked though.

    But if you happen to have a setup for individual remote testing, using it obviously makes sense as it probably looks more like the live server than your dev machine.
  • 0
    @Oktokolo my disagreement was with the hard always statement. Had a good setup in my old company where you would sync the project from the IDE to a specific place in the home folder and that would trigger the whole thing. It required a config file and that would create the service with isolated deps. Changing the resources after they where created was a pain but otherwise it worked really good.

    Especially with the advent of virtualization and containers it is common to run a whole set of services locally and local dev workflow. If not present it's easy to do it yourself. Depending on the dependencies/ environment this is not always possible or a good fit. It's nice to remember there are other ways.
  • 0
    @hjk101 Looks like my hard statement is still sorta uncontested as you too didn't really see remote testing implemented in a truly painless way.

    But the real question is: Why?! Sure, you want to do a final safety test via CI on the test server before stuff is going live. But why shouldn't devs just test stuff locally while developing? It can make devs completely independent of any internal and external infrastructure and latency will always be better on the local beefy workstation than over the network. Local testing is well-supported by IDEs and GIT. It just works with work from home regardless of home internet connection shittyness.

    There are good reasons for not doing testing locally though. Strongly compartmentalized modular development in a need-to-know environment. Cheaping out on proper dev workstations for code monkeys (spoiler alert: they will not test anyways). And when creating mockups for otherwise untestable stuff just isn't worth it.
  • 0
    @Oktokolo never saw local testing in a truly painless way either. Don't think a developer without a certain level of masochism exists.

    It was a really good setup because we used ASIC and lot of data in the tests.
  • 0
    @hjk101 In my experience, local testing works pretty painless and smooth on the common dev PC. I test everything down to the docker container generation locally.
  • 0
    Yeah I noted pycharm took awhile to traverse new modules and the like
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