104
Japhy
3y

The professor teaching my Web Applications course (which is taught in PHP) just admitted to learning PHP two weeks before the course started 🤦🏻‍♂️

Comments
  • 15
    More than likely he was forced to it
  • 2
    @AleCx04 talking to some of my lecturers they are forced to teach in certain ways to be accredited.
    So I'd believe he's being forced to do something he disagrees with.
  • 11
    Considering how primitive PHP is, 2 weeks is probablly not that bad.
  • 5
    This sort of thing is why there is so much bad PHP about.
  • 3
    Hehe 😛
    Funny days ahead xD
  • 5
    I think I could become pretty competent with a language in 2 weeks. Enough for a course anyway. Providing you can boss another language, you already have the transferable knowledge.
  • 5
    At least your professor learnt PHP before the course began
  • 5
    You can teach anything if you are at least one lecture ahead of them. To be a good teacher, though, you need much, much more.
  • 2
    @AleCx04 @luper
    When I don't develop for work, I teach. I already covered different subjects and languages with different profiles of students. But I was never forced to teach something I don't know. Actually, a good teacher should always refuse an offer for a course if he doesn't know what it's about. Think of it as his own responsibility as a professional teacher: saying yes on that kind of offers will bring him money, but it will not help the students who are in the need of proper knowledge from him.

    I made this same mistake a few times, years ago, when I was just starting as a teacher. And everytime I was unconfortable with the knowledge I didn't have. Then I learnt to say no when I have to. And so I'm never again stressed or unconfortable with my position, and my students actually can learn useful things.

    All that for saying, he was not forced. He probably just wanted the money, but without caring at all for his students. He's a bad teacher, no matter PHP or whatever else.
  • 1
    @Froot Maybe it's so primitive because of people (teachers and/or students) stopping learning and thinking they're good to go after only 2 weeks ? Understanding and using this language (or another) the right way takes time.

    You have to learn the syntax yeah, but also, all the specific parts, plus security, plus OOP (at least how OOP is done with this particular language), how to manage projects, take a look on major packages such frameworks or libraries, learn the common design patterns, and so many things.

    If PHP gives you the feeling that it can be mastered in only 2 weeks, I think there's a problem here. Because, in m'y opinion, no language can be mastered so quickly.
  • 3
    @Masta I think the main point here is that PHP shouldn't be mastered, or used at all. Let the corpse rest in peace for fuck sake 😄
  • 3
    @Froot I'm not really looking for reopening this old debate, we'll not agree anyway. Let's just say I think PHP is not the issue here (the teacher is), while you just troll :)
  • 2
    @lunorian I don't agree. You can learn the basics, but your code will suck in many ways. If you want to produce a code that's actually great enough for 2018, you'll need more than a week or two. But hey, it's good to be confident. But blaming the language will always be way easier than learning how to use it properly.
  • 1
    @Masta I just can't pass an opportunity to rag on PHP 🤣
  • 0
    Maybe the course will explain why PHP is such a shitty language that shouldn't be used and just move on to a more competent language? In this case, 2 weeks is more than enough.
  • 2
    Actually I have to teach PHP to a class of 30 students next month. They'll have about 30 hours of courses with me.

    If I didn't know PHP yet, let's be honnest, I totally could learn enough in one month to do a good enough job because it's only 30 hours: they would learn the basics and I would walk off and wait my paycheck.

    But because I have a lot more experience with the language, the course will be far less boring for them and for me. I can go beyond the basics and provide them useful things like practical use cases, best practices from the start, architecture advices, etc. All that because I already know the language. And right now I can use the time I have until day one to prepare a great course instead of learning what I should already know.

    So I'm glad I already know PHP, and otherwise I think I'd never have accepted the offer anyway.

    @Froot @NGPixel
    I will not feed the troll! :P
  • 0
    At least it's not a C++ class. I've been studying and that for over a decade and I still sometimes feel like an idiot even I'm coding 😂
  • 1
    Please please only use PHP 7.
    Proper OOP. Better performance. All in all shit tons of improvement.
  • 0
    @antic No worries, I need to take that next term
  • 0
    People
    Hate
    PHP
    Get over it
  • 1
    And then people laugh at me that PHP is insecure...

    huehuehue, not my fault teachers don't study it before giving a class
  • 1
    @FinlayDaG33k the secret truth is if you don't implement the security protocol, none of the language is secured by nature.
  • 1
    @sunfishcc it's like schrodingers law.
    It's both secure and insecure until you test it :^)
  • 0
    @FinlayDaG33k I just tried using node.js with passport Facebook token. Everything works like a charm 🤣
  • 1
    Ours 'learned' Angular the weekend before 'teaching' us... by showing a russian video... we are not russian
  • 0
    @matt961 You must have used it wrong then. Compared to PHP, it's a piece of art.
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