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Comments
  • 10
    Lol, so accurate.
    I tend to run away from books with titles like "Basics of *". Had a basics of inorganic chemistry textbook. It took me months to get through the first few chapters.
  • 0
  • 5
    Well.. that's a very big nut or the in depth is a bigger on the inside 🤔 * flies away in a tardis*
  • 0
  • 2
    The dude's got a "&" in his surname
  • 1
  • 0
    @RememberMe @gymmerDeveloper you guys seem familiar. XD
  • 1
    That C# in Depth book is by Jon Skeet, I'll doubt many things but I'll never doubt that Jon Skeet is the biggest expert on C#.
  • 0
    @mega6382 So, Is C# 7.0 in a nutshell is misleading one. XD
  • 0
    Amazing picture!

    I have zero knowledge of C#. But Skeet's book has updates till v5. So unless the versions 6 and 7 added more features which the other book covers, something is definitely off 🤔
  • 1
    Well. It seems like it's easier to dig yourself a hole in C# than to make it very short and concise.
  • 1
    Maybe the Nutshell book has a lot more examples, bigger text, larger margins?
    The In-depth book can be less verbose, more quick-paced, with eye-straining font size ;-)
  • 1
    @TempestasLudi I think the answer is in "The Definitive Reference". It's a reference book. And, of course, it's O'Reilly.
  • 0
    Just like some people: seem to be a big deal on the surface but are a lot less when you get to know them in depth.
  • 2
    The more I think about it, I feel that we have forgot the fact how "deep" the books are. We are missing the 3rd dimension here
  • 1
    That's a big ass nutshell
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