4
nibor
21d

Is writing "payed" for the past tense of "pay" (as in to have given money) the most common mistake non native English speakers make?

It's "paid" not "payed".

Comments
  • 9
    No, its trusting hoes
  • 4
    Loose and lose is a common one. @ganjaman was nearly there.
  • 4
    Sorii, I did not hear what you sayed, I should have payed more attention.
  • 2
  • 3
    Paid... unless the person is attempting to still spell by sound.
  • 2
    I payded you're mom
  • 2
    Don't get me started on there, their and they're. Mind you, a lot of native English speakers don't seem to know the difference between them all either.
  • 0
    The only time "payed" should be used is if you're working on a boat
  • 0
    @nibor or 'then' and 'than'.
  • 0
    oh that's easy, it's harder to find out how many extra 'L' and 'N' i have to add on "millennium"
  • 0
    "actual" when they mean "current" is something I see a lot in source code. It's because German has "aktuell" and French "actuel" for "current".

    Also the faux Latin plural "stati" when people pretend to know shit about Latin. Which they don't because the Latin plural of "status" is "statūs" with long u. Unlike many other Latin words ending on -us, status is not o-declination which has the -i plural, but u-declination.

    @darksideofyay That's easy. Millennials are "lazy noobs" so that you need an extra l and n.
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop you can't really use current in that meaning if the product is related to electricity. I'm not saying that actual is the correct replacement.
  • 0
    @electrineer You can because current in that use is an adjective while electric current is a noun so that they will be used differently.
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop never talk about "current voltage"
  • 0
    @electrineer This term would not make any sense when interpreting current as noun.
  • 0
    @Fast-Nop but it is unnecessarily confusing.
  • 0
    @electrineer compared to the syntax of C++, it's a piece of cake.
Your Job Suck?
Get a Better Job
Add Comment