6

For all the professionals - I really do not find my course in Software Engineering challenging and I even finished first in my class last year. I have been programing in java and javascript with spring and angular but now I am focusing on android. Do you reckon I should stay and finish my degree or just make a portfolio and apply for a job in the industry? Thanks in advance

Comments
  • 6
    employers do like degrees a bunch
  • 2
    It always seemed illogical though, because I personaly would rather hire a guy who proved he can write 10 20 thousand lines of clean code, rather than a kid (like my colleagues) whos struggling with basic inheritance ://
  • 6
    @architect employers value papers more than past projects, sadly that is one of the hard realities in most companies.
    The hr department is usually not that knowledgeable when it comes to tech, so they don't know what to look for and think the paper is their best bet
  • 2
    Also, wouldn't it be a waste if you left? You'd have experience but no degree?
  • 4
    Do both. Get a degree, make a portfolio of personal projects, and get a developer job while in school. Have every base covered.
  • 2
    Well I guess I will continue paying 9000 pounds a year for a paper :/... Thanks for the quick response though. Love the community
  • 1
    @architect how far into the program are you?
  • 2
    Currently in my second year of study
  • 1
    @architect To be fair no one learns a whole lot during the first year of any degree as they have to start with the basics. I felt the same way my first year but by the end I was so glad I went.
  • 2
    That is what I though but last year I made a messaging android app (simple one) and one of the lecturers told me it would pass for a final year project.
  • 5
    @architect stick to your degree. I don't have one and it makes employers ignore me even though I have 18 years in the industry. A lot of my work can't go in portfolios due to nda's
  • 4
    @architect my advice would be to spend the semesters that you aren't really learning much doing personal projects and doing your own research. When your classes get interesting focus on those. Try to always be learning, even after you graduate.
  • 1
    @weil41 I am programming for about 8 - 10hours every day it is just frustrating when you cannot prove to employers that you can code :D
  • 1
    @architect I totally get that, but try not to think of it has a road block but as a period to focus on becoming the best developer/engineer you can. You will be surprised just how much better you can get in 4 years
  • 2
    I will, and thank you for the advice :)
  • 1
    Hey, I am 21 and in 3rd year, quiting later this year. If I need to have a degree to work somewhere, then that is definitely not the place I would work anyway, because even if hired they would not judge me on merit of code or skill.
    Think about it.
    Freelance > get self sustained > take leap of faith.
    Choice is yours, try and miss or never try.
  • 1
    If I could go back, I'd get a business degree instead.
  • 0
  • 2
    @architect I learned most, if not all, of my programming skills outside of class anyway. What I really want is to start my own business, hopefully a semi-automatic, passive income type business. But I don't know the first thing about business or marketing or anything like that. Granted, a lot of business might also be learned outside the classroom, but I think a business degree would also help me interact with clients better.
  • 0
    I think you have a point, unfortunately though I am already two years in SE... I am shit at business as well btw :D
  • 0
    One of the main things that an employer likes to see by you having a degree is that you are committed to something and can see it through. Giving up for whatever reason after completing half of it, can only appear bad.

    Just stick with it, and hey, enjoy your time as a student, once you get a job you will be missing all the free time. :)
Add Comment