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Hey devRant. What the fuck is up?

I'm new and just wanted to say hi or whatever. I don't even work in any computer science related job. I'm a fucking welder.

I have aspirations one day to be just like you nerds. I fall asleep at my desk almost every night taking random online programming classes which I lose interest halfway through to some OTHER class and redo the same shit.

Is this what it's like to be smart?

Comments
  • 7
    Welcome to devRant @AleCx04's brother, who knew @Jilano would be right!!!

    https://devrant.com/rants/2354972/...

    On a serious note, yes, we slave at learning, and learn to fail at it 😂
  • 5
    Welcome! A lot of us hear marvel at people with practical skills who can do stuff like welding. Certainly a bit of a mystery to me!
  • 6
    @C0D4 Ha! The Legion of Madfellows is always right, but misunderstood!
  • 3
    Welcome :)

    As long as you dream about it and work on that dream, you're gonna suceed one day.
  • 5
    @C0D4 your statement both confused me and inspired me. Let let me also add that before I got this job welding I was in the Army (the lamest of the two).

    I guess I don't want to affiliate myself with these 'robo welders'? Man you nerds are weird.🤣
  • 3
    Also thank you all for the welcomes (also on a serious note) all of this stuff seems like so much to take in. It's so hard to focus on one area when I want to do so much.
  • 5
    You sure you wanna spend 8-10 hours a day sitting in front of a computer?
  • 6
    Yo are you trying to tell us Welding is easy or something? Professional welders have to learn all kinds of techniques. Plus once you weld something that's basically it, you don't get to go "oops" and just undo and redo again. Plus you have arc welding, mig welding, beam welding et cetera. No joke, I actually wanted to be a blacksmith at a professional level when I was younger. You know, make old tools and weapons as movie props and so on. There's still work for people in that trade. Welding is almost halfway there. I dare say that your job is more difficult in some ways than being a programmer. Good luck. If you stick at something long enough you become a professional at it, no matter what it is.
  • 5
    @molaram 8-10? What kind of dev are you?
    I don't know any dev that's < 12 per day 👀

    That's not necessarily work hours though.
  • 3
    @molaram my wrists, back, legs, and hands are so destroyed from my previous jobs sitting down pecking at a keyboard almost sounds like a dream job.

    But I don't ever think I'll make it to that level, honestly. I could maybe see myself doing random freelance work or make an app or two.

    I enjoy technology. I like to see how things work. This is more of a hobby. And if I get some cash money so be it!

    Cyber security sure sounds lucrative tho... 😉
    (Kidding)
  • 3
    @C0D4 I do other things as well but still spend too much time in front of the computer.
  • 4
    @pythonInRelay I appreciate the kind words of encouragement! But it is just a skill. I'm not that good at it. I work in a fabrication shop. Pretty much customer has stupid ideas I reproduce those stupid ideas. From what I read on here it seems both careers are pretty similar.
  • 4
    @TheAnonyMOST oh dude. I can't even begin to tell you that's exactly what being a developer is all about. Doing stupid things for stupid people who think they are not only smart ideas, but they want credit for them.

    If you don't like that it'll be out of the frying pan and into the fire my dude 😉.

    Minor jokes aside. Try it for 3 months. Then take a day or two to see how you feel about your progress and what you know. Do you have any specific field you're interested in?
  • 0
    @TheAnonyMOST CAD may be a bit more profitable, software markets are kind of fucked up nowadays with certain people competing @ $2/h. You'd still spend time at the computer but definitely better than cursing half a day at some stupid ass cryptic error.

    Ever played with Solidworks?
  • 0
    @molaram dunno where you live but we're still at like $2 a minute here. Not $2 an hour wtf? Where do you live, Afghanistan?
  • 0
    @pythonInRelay no I was trying to say there's a lot of competition at $2/h from countries like India, Paki and so on, you know what I mean. People are stupid, they will just throw $ at whoever quotes the lowest rates.
  • 1
    @pythonInRelay so far the only language I have any competency in is python. I was told it was the "LANGUAGE OF THE FUTURE", and it is a very good first one I think.

    These are several 'goals' I have made myself:

    - learn Java/Kotlin and make a Android app
    (Want a note taking app that's like Google keep, but... Better)

    -learn html, JavaScript, CSS obviously (I really enjoy playing the CTF on hacker101 although I've only found one flag so far) Bug bounties are cool AF

    -do SOMETHING with python. Honestly I think it would be badass to sqlinject a random website for email/passwords (I know I know it's illegal I'm not going to)

    -i read a lot more on cyber security than I thought I would.

    I enjoy building shit no matter how dumb the customer's idea is.
  • 2
    @molaram yeah I have an associate's degree in Architectural Drafting and Design ( AutoCAD). ,🤣

    I'm pretty diverse.
  • 1
    @molaram like I said. Not really trying to make a career from this side project of mine. If something comes of it that'd be great, but learning it is what I'm after.

    What better place to learn than from all the real pros. Not some LinkedIn bitch group.
  • 1
    @TheAnonyMOST awesome :)

    I don't use linkedin, I remember it used to be big back in the day, sounds like it sucks doggy ass now?
  • 2
    @AlmondSauce yea, you marvel at how lost we get over the most basic things 😂
  • 2
    @molaram @M1sf3t I have spent HOURS trying to solve a challenge on sololearn several times.. it's depressing.
  • 1
    @TheAnonyMOST it happens. Less with practice, but I think even the experts occasionally nuke a problem
  • 4
    Welcome! Ahh, the fellow wants to become a nerd like us? Great! Get those jar-bottom-thick glasses first and we'll begin!

    Now here's a first lesson for you: every job and every profession sucks. They all suck, just in different ways. Pretty much all of them can have adverse effect on your health unless you constantly put extra effort in it. Programming is no exception.

    Lesson 2: Times when learning a programming language was enough are in the past now. Learning languages is step 1. The next chapter is called "Frameworks". And this is the chapter where you choose what kind of dev you want to be: web, embedded, desktop, automaton, etc. as there are far too many frameworks to master them all.

    Lesson 3: It's constant learning (as technologies change). Learning to admit our mistakes and
    take measures to remediate them and prevent them in the future professionally is a large part of our job. Mistakes will happen - that was supposed to be a Lesson #0. My mistake.
  • 1
    If he's a welder and he was in the army I imagine he's about had all of one type of suck he can stand 😂
  • 0
    The moment you build something (a tool or whatever) that solves a problem you have using computers... you will be hooked to programming.
  • 1
    Everyone is better at life experiences here so am not gonna go for that, am 21 and already very confused where to go

    Regarding java/Android, i saw you wanna make a note taking app. I am somewhat ok in that and might be helpful, @ me if you get stuck ;)

    (1 advice : choose either java or kotlin<whichever you find easy> for android dev but not both. Both languages are supported to a great extent but kotlin is usually preferred by those having a good grip in java/advance programming concepts)
  • 2
    I hope you guys have notifications on because I already forget your names when I clicked comment haha. Thank you all so very much for the advice and guidance. I hope you all don't mind if I keep you and your nerd brains in my ' toolbox'. The community here is way more welcoming than I thought it would be and that's pretty fucking awesome.

    You have renewed my motivation!
  • 2
    Desk jobs can make you really fat if you're not careful...if you're used to moving around and you switch to sitting and not moving for 8+ hours it'll be a real shit show if you eat the same lol. I gained like 25lbs in a year...

    but yeah people kinda shit on desk jobs but IMO they're fucking great (and people don't realize how good they have it). I worked at Walmarts and prisons and pizzarias and homes for behavioral teens...everything where you're running around and doing a bunch of shit. Now I'm sitting down in an air conditioned office or chillin at home doing a bunch of shit.

    I'm just starting a career in tech or w/e but I like learning stuff. it's tough and I'm currently having a hard time not feeling like a total idiot during this bootcamp but I'll push through.

    Good luck and have fun!
  • 2
    That feeling of uncertainty you have late at night when you're grinding on some code and it's going nowhere and it's like there's giant new framework to learn every month? It's never going to leave you, you might as well get used to it. It's part of the nature of this profession.

    Even the highest level pros get that same feeling. They might be doing much different stuff at a higher level, but they feel the same as you do. The most successful ones embrace it and thrive on the challenge and uncertainty.

    I can't offer advice without knowing who you are, except for one thing that helped me as a career switcher that got involved with software development 20 years ago.

    You might think that the best thing to do is to dive into the most popular languages/technology. That's not necessarily true. If you pursue the most popular stuff, you'll end up with an ocean of competition for jobs. It's much better to find a niche where you have unique skills, preferably leveraging what you already know.
  • 1
    Bro that Intro is funny as fuck! welcome man! Its cool here. Youll get back pain and BS boss sometimes but all good still. haha.
  • 2
    @C0D4 lmao it keeps happening! I keep trying to get my brother into welding and these dudes keep jumping into the dev field! whyyyyyy :P

    Just kidding, welcome to the community @TheAnonyMOST !
  • 2
    Oh, a welder! You'll fit right in. Some code can't be touched without a blowtorch.
  • 2
    @AleCx04 cause welding kinda sucks, man. I'm so sick of getting slag in my gloves, hair, face, ears, everywhere. The shit defies physics and goes around all protective equipment just to burn the fuck out of you.
  • 1
    @spurius I do appreciate your advice and in a way I agree, but it's always good to have that safety net when. No one needs your niche. Lol
  • 2
    @jbrandona119 I'm so looking forward to getting fat... 🤣
  • 1
    @cprn I do the opposite of every tutorial I've taken so far. I try to find out how much code I can create to do something that would only take one line. ,😎
  • 1
    Welcome to coding. It is a satisfying hobby.
    But if you like to code and want to keep it that way, don't do it at work.
  • 4
    @TheAnonyMOST

    Actually, a "niche" skillset in computing pays far better and has more security than general purpose web-developer. What employers really want is buyer's market where they get to choose from vast number of developers. They want you to compete with people in India who make a third of what you make as a welder now.

    If you're willing and able to go beyond the web-framework-du-jour into something more specific you'll be better off. When your skillset is hard to find, you're the one who benefits the most.
  • 0
    @spurius this does make total sense and I completely agree. I guess my point I was trying to get across is more geared towards freelance work, e.g. you can find some work building a website for some local small business while searching for a career in the speciality of choice.

    Personally money in a job is not everything. I would absolutely (and am currently) take a little less money for a better work environment. Though I know my worth and I won't be robbed. Lol

    What, in your opinion, is a under staffed speciality in the dev/computer science field? To me it looks like everything has already been done. I'm sure that's just me not having creative ideas.
  • 1
    @TheAnonyMOST been there, tried that. Its not that it isn't doable but most local businesses either undervalue the work your doing or they just simply can't afford it. Plus most will want a quote upfront which is hard to give them when your green.

    Not saying don't try it, worse case you might make a couple bucks while your learning and building experience. Just be prepared to lowball yourself til you get it figured out.
  • 0
    @M1sf3t I've made a couple bucks just using an app to build a website once. Had no idea how to code at all. Lol It wasn't much, but honestly I didn't really do anything.

    I doubt I'll ever see the inside of an office as a developer, really so odd jobs are fine.

    Who knows.. maybe I have the next candy crush inside my head...
  • 1
    @TheAnonyMOST don't sell yourself short, if you can remember what rods and what amps to use with which metals then you can remember which code to use with which problems.

    Not that there aren't jobs out there that require a lot of experience and knowledge but hangout here long enough and you'll come to find a good percent of your working juniors to be complete dumbasses. The reason they have jobs is b/c this industry is like any other in that for every specialist, you need three or four cheap employees to handle scut work.

    As far as the comp. from india goes, i wouldn't sweat it to much unless your just stuck somewhere like NY or the bay. If your like me and live somewhere like bum fucked MS, then you can afford to work for half the price of someone from the valley and a lot of your good employers will be willing to pay the little extra to hire someone that doesn't speak broken english. Plus they can employ you directly, I think international workers have to be contracted.
  • 0
    Born and raised in MS. Ridgeland if you have ever heard of it. Right above Jackson. My shitty first marriage took me to PA and the army took me to Southern California 😄. Still a ways from the bay. High Desert. Although I really don't like California politics, I enjoy living so close to Vegas and LA. Haha

    Thank you for your kind words and motivation, broth... Nerd. 😄I do look forward to learning from you guys.

    Edit: @M1SF3T
  • 1
    @TheAnonyMOST haha yea i know were ridgeland is, we played in the state tennis tournament up there a couple of times. I'm a little further down the pearl, just north of the state line.

    You'll get things figured out as you go along. Just try to stick to books and documentation instead of those "how to build x in ten minutes" blogs and videos. You'll pick things up a lot faster in the long run that way.
  • 1
    @M1sf3t I'm pretty sure we just became best friends.

    I am currently work on that Google automated python for it course. (Got that financial aid, son!) And whatever random classes I can geta hold of for free.
  • 3
    @TheAnonyMOST that doesn't seem to be a bad field to get into. The google classes aren't bad either, I took a couple for the web. You can find some free books on python at goalkicker and automate the boring stuff. Seems like LearnC.org may have a python course as well.
  • 2
    @M1sf3t automate all the things!
  • 1
    Woa woaa - I'm no nerd!

    Welcome aboard :)

    Been there, done that! Don't listen to all the but's - seriously fuck it. Every job has it's downsides. Also right now take a note of all the people that doubt you so that they get the front seat watching 💪🏼 it'll be priceless in the future.
  • 0
    @arfro I appreciate the good vibes, nerd 🤣
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