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olback
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In my uni course "Algorithms and Data structures" we use Java. Fine. Definitely not my preferred language but it's not like I have a choice.

Anyway, our teacher uploads code files for us to use as reference/examples. The problem is, they look like this. Not only does she not indent the code, she also uses a charset that is not utf-8.

In the rare cases where she does indent the code, she uses THREE, yes THREE spaces...

Comments
  • 6
    Is she distributing it with git? If not I'd suspect whatever tool she's using is stripping chars. Either that or she's just copy pasting out of some material in an eLearning system.
  • 11
    @SortOfTested Nobody who is capable of using Git would use non-English comments like a fucking noob.
  • 10
    @Fast-Nop
    You don't write technical German comments? I am such disappoint 😭
  • 16
    @SortOfTested Sometimes, I'm even struggling to express such tech stuff in German because I'm so used to English.

    Commenting source code in German would feel about as awkward as going to office when wearing the underpants over the trousers.
  • 4
    @SortOfTested except the comment is in Swedish, not German.

    But as a Swede, I agree, I never use Swedish in comments.

    In a PR sure, thats a temporary thing to a known person, but a comment you never know who will have to read.
  • 2
    @Voxera
    Fast is german
  • 4
    @Voxera german is worse since encoding is usually guessed and this fails with german, since some symbols are differently encoded in latin1 and unicode in the extended area.
  • 5
    I write comments in Chinese characters though I don't understand them.
  • 3
    Also, this is one of the reasons I liked Python when I used to code in Java. I can definitely see the ugly side of Python but this is the kind of code I had to deal with back in my Java days. If people can write code in one line, they'll do it.
  • 3
  • 5
    Oh Boi, that hurts.
    The worst I had to put up with in A&DS was "Throwing is always better than reporting".
    Like, the prof never heard of Go or Rust........or C.
  • 1
    Ah, the typical Swedish programming instructor. She also uses åäö in variable names?
  • 1
    @metamourge Actually, you can have exceptions in C (sort of) - but setjmp/longjmp are not usually taught in programming courses because they're goto on steroids.
  • 1
    @SortOfTested in the image, last method, that comment is in Swedish :)
  • 1
    @Voxera
    We're aware πŸ˜‹
  • 6
    Some of my fellow students, write comments in danish, some even writes variable names etc in danish. Its a living nightmare, i am just glad i am not the one that have to review that piece of shit.
  • 2
    At work I also have to write comments in German.. *sigh*
  • 3
    @stop *ö ä ü noises*
  • 2
    @Ranchu *æ ø å noises*
  • 3
    @Ranchu @Frederick *å ä ö noises* (I wanna play too)
  • 4
  • 2
    @stop this is illegal you know.
  • 3
    ẞ
  • 5
    And then there's French where even sailor style swearing sounds like a blowjob from Galadriel.
  • 2
    @Ranchu
    - you cant, sell money!
    - but they did it.
    Things that happened at the court
  • 1
    @stop äêügh
  • 0
    Well, to be fair, I believe Swedish universities by law are required to use swedish terminology. Though, it’s not always abided.
  • 0
    My teacher would write method names with äöü and shit.
    Always took him a second to realize why the program didn't compile.
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