9
feynman
18d

Ok, this is very naive - but it’s claimed Russia is trying to hack institutes in the west for coronavirus antidote research. My question is, shouldn’t such research be completely ‘open source’ anyway?

Comments
  • 6
    Imho yes, it should, like every medical/pharmaceutical research. I think pharma business has gone too far and there is too much money at stake...

    I might sound ridiculous, but it wouldn't surprise me if all this coronavirus thing was actually started by them to sell antidotes/vaccines.

    After all it's industry. Remember what they say in "the wolf of wall street"? Create the need and then sell the solution.

    (I'm not a accusing anyone nor claiming anything. It would just not surprise me)
  • 4
    Depends on who's funding it. If it's the state with tax money, it should be public.

    If it's a company, then it shouldn't - because one successful product in hundred has to make up for the money wasted on the other 99 that didn't make it. Making it public would mean that companies would not be able to fund research anymore.

    Apart from that, I wouldn't take the vaccination. Last time such a rushed vaccination was pushed to the market, that was the swine flu, it turned out that heavy vaccination damages were involved. People who would fall asleep from one second to the other and could never lead a normal life anymore.

    That's why I only take vaccinations with good long term experience.
  • 0
    It is if they are part of the W.H.O, if I remember correctly.

    Let me go find a source...

    https://who.int/news-room/detail/...
  • 1
    Such research usually is made open when it's complete, but not *while* it's in progress, as this potentially leads to others trying to clone, finish and publish said work earlier than the original team can finish it, claiming authorship (and potentially patents.)

    In any case, reading between the lines I think the aim with these hacks was to disrupt, rather than extract data.
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop As one is apparently not even very immune against reinfection after having gone through an infection, working vaccines will never exist.
  • 1
    @kescherRant Yeah, that's what it looks like. Hardly surprising because it's the same for similar other viruses.

    I've taken vax against pneumococci because that would at least prevent a bacterial superinfection on top of the viral one. Also, I wouldn't need to bomb my body with antibiotics while it is already busy fighting the virus (antibiotics work only against bacteria, not against viruses).
  • 1
    Oooh scary Russian Boogeyman threatening the western companies right to patent not dying.
  • 0
    vaccines are not profitable. cancer meds and insulin and other meds that are needed on a daily base are more profitable.
  • 1
    Exactly what I was thinking
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop Indeed, but medical research should not be a private business at all.
  • 1
    @dmonkey I think it should because the risk of going bankrupt is what keeps companies from going all out crazy like unis which already are increasingly failing even at their core purpose of education.

    Fund that research with tax money, and you'll get no useful output at all because politicians and woketards will meddle in to waste the tax money on everything other than actual research.
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop Agree.

    It's still immoral, but you're right...
  • 0
    My brother and I were arguing about the same thing earlier. His point was Russian hackers were checking to see who makes the best vaccine. That's so fucking stupid. I think it's either 'fake news' or some other country using 7 proxies is doing the hacking. I doubt Russia needs to steal research data. All I know is my brother is an idiot I won the argument.
  • 0
    It’s probably just politically-loaded fake news. That seems to be all there is now. 🤦🏻‍♀️
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