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mr-user
42d

Rest In Peace my Hermes E2 mechanical keyboard. I have been using it for about 4 year and today the shift key on the left side of the keyboard broke.

I think the shift key is physically broken since I already try to clean the keyboard but it isn't working anymore.

The keyboard should still be workable for normal user but programming with that keyboard is a hell.

You only notice how much left shift key is important for programming when you try to program with alternative (right shift key)

Comments
  • 1
    Damn, that's not very long for a mechanical even with daily use. My QuickFire TK is almost 7 years old
  • 0
    @theuser

    I been using it for about 12 hour each day on average.

    Do you have any recommendation on which mechanical keyboard should I buy next?

    I am not interested in being programming , able to change light or any of those fancy feature.

    I am looking for a keyboard which is durable and the keys are easy for my fingers.
  • 0
    I’ve been using cheap ass $30 Zalman mechanical keyboard I got like 8 years ago, it’s blastin cheap Kailh Mx red knockoffs. When a switch was bitching at me, I just sprayed it with wd-40. This mf will outlast me I guess
  • 0
    Could you swap the allegedly broken switch with one from a less used key?
  • 0
    @electrineer

    I do not think so. When I press the key I hear a normal mechnical click sound but the input is not going to my computer.
  • 0
    @electrineer

    It seem my keyboard model don't support the key binding (I think) so I cannot just switch less frequently used key such as Function (Fn) as shift key.
  • 0
    @mr-user can you replace the switch easily or does it require soldering?
  • 0
    @electrineer

    I can pull out the switch with my hand easily as shown in the image above.
  • 0
    @mr-user the switch is still in place in the image
  • 0
    @electrineer

    My mistake.

    I cannot easily replace the switch , I think it is held together by some kind of glue.

    I think I need to put some kind of heat (soldering?) to remove it.
  • 1
    If it's just that switch, it makes no sense to throw away the whole keyboard just because of it. It should be fixable by desoldering this switch and soldering in a new one in its place. It's held in place by being 1) soldered to the PCB and 2) clipped into the plate above the PCB. After desoldering it, you should be able to push it out from the opposite side after removing the stabiliser wire.

    P.S. There are stores selling single switches or packs of 10, just search based on your location.
  • 0
    @mr-user break it apart and check the back plate. Some aren’t soldered, if so, a switch replacement is really cheap.

    You can also check if the switch is broken with a simple cable, short both contacts.
  • 0
    A decent mechanical keyboard should last your working life; the switches are supposed to be good for like 3 million keypresses each. My Das keyboard is still going strong after 7 years, it's built like a brick shit-house.
  • 0
    You could try contacting the manufacturer as they claim the switches have a life cycle of 50 million presses.
  • 0
    Oh yeah I'm actually an order of magnitude out on the no. of keypresses...
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