12
lopu
17d

Are you.. are you telling me .. that every time ..... every time ..... I've been running ..... npm i something .... it's been putting ^version into my ..... package.json file ?!?!?!?!!? SO THAT IN THE FUTURE WHEN I COME BACK TO THE PROJECT AND DO A FRESH NPM I .... THE VERSIONS WILL ALL UPDATE .... AND THAT'S WHY I'M ALWAYS DEALING WITH BUGS WHEN COMING BACK TO PROJECTS EVEN THOUGH IT WAS WORKING WHEN I LEFT IT A FEW MONTHS AGO.

FUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU

Comments
  • 2
    Stop yelling
  • 3
    @Creep BUT IT'S A PISS OFF! WHY SHOULDN'T HE BE YELLING???
  • 0
    Yeah how awful...
    Go eat something, it’ll make u feel better
  • 1
    what about putting @ instead of ^?
  • 1
    @melezorus34 🤔 I've heard of ^, *, and ~ but what does @ do?
  • 2
    @NoMad lol I somehow remembered it wrong, it's just "" instead of "@"
  • 0
    That is why package-lock.json exists and a reason why deployments use npm ci instead of npm install. The only bad thing about npm ci is that it always deletes whole node_modules folder making installation taking a while.
  • 0
    @arekxv but package-lock.json has such horrendous compatibility with git? Unless you can give me some pointers for committing package-lock effectively.

    I've read about npm ci that's how I realised that versions are being prefixed with ^, IMO versions should just be whatever version is installed, not any version above that, that just seems like such a dumb and horrible idea to make a dependency allowed to be any version above the version that the user installed at a given point in time
  • 0
  • 1
    @NoMad ty :')
  • 1
    @melezorus34 You might be thinking of when you install a specific version using npm i, such as npm i package@version

    the problem is that even when doing that, what gets put into package.json is the version prefixed by the ^ so later installs might install a newer version, it's absurd imo
  • 1
    @lopu Simple. Dont use npm install. It modifies package-lock by updating packages and ignoring package-lock most of the time. Use it only to add new or update existing packages.

    When two people update / install all packages through npm install it modifies package-lock and you get a conflict.

    npm ci follows package-lock only always reproducing exact versions of packages you initially installed. The only downside to it is that it takes a while so if you update frequently its a pain. yarn is a bit better in that regard but I think it also updates its lock file.
  • 0
    alright cool cool cheers I'll give it a shot
  • 0
    @arekxv oh boy this is gonna be difficult to unlearn, I might have to alias npm i to npm ci :') I manually delete node_modules all the time anyway because I'm paranoid of corruption
  • 1
    There is a '--save-exact' or '-E' cli option, but they just want you to learn it the hard way.

    Back in the day I was dealing with some problems because even the fucking aws-sdk module was broken because of the fucking npm version ranges making the servers install the broken module version. Since then I use the 'save exact' param even for modules I'm just testing 😓
  • 1
    @JhonDoe seriously it should be on by default, it doesn't make sense
  • 1
    It's a very simplistic approach, but what I do is during development, when I generally DO want to be coding against the latest versions, I let NPM do its thing and I update frequently (usually at the start of each coding session) and re-run tests each time, fixing any issues. Then, when the code is ready for release or is otherwise "done", I simply go into package.json, remove all the ^'s, leaving just pristine, specific version numbers (I usually delete node_modules and package-lock.json too and then do a final install and re-run all tests, just to be safe). It's a bit more manual effort, but it allows me to be in control of my code rather than risking a breakage because I let NPM think for me.
  • 0
    @fzammetti great idea, I'm glad I've figured this out I thought I was going insane with my repositories breaking simply by leaving them to time...
  • 1
    @fzammetti That is risky. Using ^ on a version 2.3.4 will result in any version between 2.3.4 and 3.0.0. By removing the ^ you would be affixing to the exact version even though you might have worked and tested with a later version.

    For instance you used ^2.3.4 and worked on your code for 2 months. During that time package maintainer released critical security fixes upping the package to 2.5.5. You worked on 2.5.5 effectively. Tested everything and then removed the ^. Causing npm to install 2.3.4 next time. If you want to affix versions, use the ones in your package-lock then set those directly and you wont have issues.
  • 0
    @arekxv good point
  • 1
    @arekxv You're exactly right, and I'm an idiot because when I wrote that comment I forgot that's precisely what I do, I don't just drop the ^ like I wrote for exactly the reason you say, I use the package-lock versions as you said (to be fair, it's been a little while since I've done that, but still, I should NOT have forgotten that key step, thanks for checking me!).
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