13
ayushjn
37d

Why the hell would you even use Windows for programming? I use it only for gaming.

Comments
  • 7
    Substantially less hassle with the os overall?
  • 13
    @ScriptCoded oooooh I beg to differ
  • 8
    I don't think Windows is a less hassle OS. It is just you cannot do stuff or you'll never learn to do certain things on Windows. I'm pretty sure working with Linux is more productive compared to Windows. For example, installing development softwares like mongodb or sql is a pain in the ass on Windows as compared to Linux.
  • 3
    on dual boot case: because I'm too lazy and too old to reboot to get into gaming; I just want to open steam whenever I want. like in a long work session I may want to play a quick game of fall guys without needing to close the shitton of programs from work

    on virtual machine case: not a chance I run a setup like this one 😂
  • 4
    As an administrator for Windows servers (customers request that), using Windows on my workstation makes it significantly easier.
  • 2
    @ayushjn well, WSL it's a big improvement in that department of installing database servers and whatnot in "windows"
  • 3
    @ayushjn Ever heard about WSL? Installing anything is just an "apt" away. And we even have docker on Windows nowadays :)

    Edit @JhonDoe: You beat me by 2 minutes.
  • 2
    @sbiewald so beat it 🎵 just beat it 🎵 (michael jackson scream here)
  • 2
    @JhonDoe I feel ya. I'm on dual boot. Even I don't want to reboot for gaming. Steam is now supported on Linux but still. I just hope all games would get support for linux in future.

    I tried WSL, I like the terminal but it is quite confusing. Also, due to lack of resources it is hard to debug if you run into some issue.
  • 3
    @sbiewald I've heard that Microsoft employees have to work on Windows and it completely freaks me out.
  • 1
    @sbiewald Afaik docker on Windows is still not in mainstream. It barely runs.
  • 3
    @netikras Don't get me wrong, I'd root for Linux any day. But for someone that doesn't know how Linux works, or would put in the time to learn it, Windows is probably easier
  • 1
    @ScriptCoded Yes, I agree. I started with Windows. My question is for experienced programmers or people who are committed to learn programming.
  • 2
    @ScriptCoded Speaking as somebody that has run dual boot macOS and Windows since 2014... and so has fully managed - at a pro level, both Windows and Mac since then.

    No. What you just said is demonstrably false.
  • 9
    @ScriptCoded I hear you. But the same can be said vice-versa: for someone who does not know how Windows works, WIndows might not be the easiest choice for a dev env.

    With all the Windows magics, registers craftmanship, frequent need for restarts and stuff like that I'm not sure Windows is actually any more developer-friendly environment.
  • 1
    Shut up, it's almost the same. The only difference are the better Linux performance (not that much in new computers) and the 40% more times you have to use the console in Linux. And I don't think they are killer reasons.
  • 2
    @netikras Don't forget those untimely forced Windows updates that leave you disconnected from your machine, sometimes for hours.
  • 2
    @c3r38r170 I respect people who prefer GUI but for me the console is one of the biggest reasons why I'd prefer Linux always. In my experience it's far more productive than using GUI for programming.
  • 2
    @ayushjn You are totally right, but I use the Windows console too.
  • 1
    @ayushjn Some say they have a way to *reliably* disable them. I haven't found it though... But if people say then it must be possible!
  • 4
    @netikras That might be so, but there's a lot more work for the typical person to run a Linux instance. Staying up to date managing drivers being the two things I think most inexperienced have issues with. Windows handles that for you. Looking at a non dev I'd say Windows is arguably easier to use. As a dev, depending on what you're developing, perhaps Linux is more suited, but I don't thing generalizing and saying that Linux is always the better choice is correct.

    @HiFiWiFiSciFi Just because you've had an experience doesn't mean that it's the common one.
  • 7
    @ScriptCoded hmm.. I'm guessing you're an Arch (or smth else of more manual nature) user?

    I'm always on LinuxMint. It (and Ubuntu AFAIK) auto-suggest updates with a nice pop-up when there are any. And graphics there just work (tm) as long as you're using Intel's stuff.

    Yeah, I guess picking the right hardware for Linux might be problematic if you want something else but Intel (although I've only had good experience with AMD graphics too) - I agree with you there.

    But the concept of everything-is-a-file, POSIX and the GNU toolset, ability to work with raw data, work with data at protocol layer, sniff and monitor everything, transparent visibility of ANYTHING happening in the system (mostly native access to everything - thanks to the everything-is-a-file), and many many more things that are difficult to achieve or impossible in Windows...

    oh, okay, I guess that's advanced level now :D

    Although I feel anything besides [next>next>finish] in Windows requires advanced-ish skills too :)
  • 3
    @netikras I'm on Kubuntu actually, though I never get nice pop-ups reminding me (might have turned them off though...). And graphics was a nightmare to get going. Not that I think about it though, yeah, plain old Ubuntu worked pretty well actually.

    I'll admit though, the reason I switched to Linux in the first place was the development experience. I guess my point is that I don't think Windows is just crap, even though I disgust it fullheartedly
  • 0
    @ayushjn Windows has Powershell since XP, which is way more powerful than bash (but very different), especially since 90% of the commands have options for running them on remote servers directly.
    For larger server installations, this is also the way to go for managing them (instead of the GUI or solely GPOs).

    Regarding Windows updates: Just configure them properly. Especially for companies, each update can be invidvidually allowed or rejected (no more "surprises").
    For regular companies through WSUS for larger ones with the enterprise suite (which name I always forget).
  • 0
    @ayushjn Docker with WSL is the way to go, running docker just in windows is a pain in the arse.

    I've used linux mint as my daily driver for about 6 years before I bought my gaming pc so I HAD(proton is good but for the sake of the 2 games that doesn't run at all, is not an option for me yet) to switch to windows. At first it was very problematic to get everything working, but after reading about WSL + Docker, things went smoothly. It's been a long year with that setup and so far so good
  • 3
    I depends WHAT you code. Working for a .NET shop (like I do)? Sure, I'll deal with Windows. I'll mostly see the IDE (and the product) anyway, so whatever. Installing updates or whatever shit is not my business at all, let the ops guys deal with the servers, MSSQL installation, IDE updates, etc.. (I do have a local admin account, so yay f.lux, but the coding happens on a Terminalserver)
  • 1
    That said for many other stacks I would much prefer Linux, especially if it's the target system.
  • 4
    @netikras @ScriptCoded Yeah this.

    I know a few tech illiterate people who run Linux (Kubuntu and such) and they find it a lot easier to use than windows.
  • 0
    It's.....the only one I know

    And I keep sliding down Fedora's learning curve
  • 1
    I started with Windows for everything. Then I got into iOS development and had first contact with macOS. After many years I’ve been using mac more and more. And not just for work. And now I find it more productive to work with than Windows. I'm also using Windows just for gaming now.
    In all those years I learned to hate Windows more than any other OS because of many small reasons which sum up. But there is no real alternative for pc gaming besides Windows.
    My teacher was right. Windows is a toy.
  • 0
    Masochism
  • 0
    Depends on what you do.
  • 1
    Making projects "Windows-compatible"
  • 0
    If your employer is a large company and provides you with the devices you need to work on, or you are an offshore worker in the same kind of environment and have to use a gateway to connect, then you don't necessarily have a choice unfortunately
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