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AI is this huge scam to me. People keep saying it will take over everything and replace everything: jobs, people, etc. It is so over hyped by people who don't understand how it actually works.

I will wonder if AI can take over everything when they can build an AI that can weed a garden.

- no chemicals, too much is used and poisons everything.
- the garden cannot be specifically designed to be weed by machine.
- the AI must differentiate between weeds and non-weeds.
- the robotic system employed must not destroy everything else while weeding.
- the AI should know when it finds random objects like gloves, or shorts, cigarettes, or electrical components that they need attention or actually pick them up. Yes, I have found these.
- it should be quick and energy efficient and not require an entire nuclear plant to run the AI. What is the point of AI powered by a server somewhere if it pollutes from afar rather than local.

I just don't see this happening in my lifetime.

Comments
  • 3
    AI, if it becomes smart, may say: "If we don't have people, then we won't need to weed any gardens." That will be doomsday.
  • 1
    now this is a good idea
  • 4
    Literally the only thing holding back full automation of non-creative tasks is the lack of proper computer vision. It is a pretty darn hard topic. But if it gets solved, the world could dramatically change in less than a generation.

    Fully automated harvesting already is a thing on the bigger farms for a lot of crops. But weeding requires reliable plant type recognition...
  • 1
    AI doesn't take over a gardener's job.
    AI takes over the weeding of hundreds of thousands of km² of farmland in India, which _can_ be specifically designed for the robot's convenience.
    Those people take over the gardener's job.
  • 2
    AI is not a scam, but hype is always hype.
  • 1
    I think if I saw an AI that really blew my mind, I’d feel differently, but until that happens, I’m in agreement that it’s much more hype than reality. Let’s face it, the goal of all corporations is to replace all their non C-Suite human workers with machines. Back in the ‘90’s I heard that application development would be dead in a decade or two due to no-code/low-code solutions. Yep, still working 50+ hr weeks doing application work and it’s 2022 last I checked. I’m waiting for my AI messiah so that I can just accept my universal basic income and go bike riding or something.
  • 3
    @fiftyhz share holders of corporations want profit. Human labor is pretty cheap in a lot of countries. And you don't need to fix the humans - just get new ones.

    Automation is used when it is cheaper than slaves who could also do the job. And there are more slaves today than ever before - we normally just don't call them slaves anymore...
  • 2
    AI is a buzzword that means little, and journalists then catch onto it and spin it into ridiculous fantasies. Then again (with few exceptions) that tends to be tech journalism in a nutshell. If you believe that crap then of course you'll be disappointed.

    The underlying technologies though - genetic algorithms, neural networks, etc. are really interesting and have tons of amazing uses (they've also advanced tremendously in the past decade or so.) I'd advise having a read if you haven't already, it's an incredibly interesting space.
  • 1
    maybe ai for making computer tasks more efficient and also combine huge data to find solutions
  • 1
    An AI to weed the garden will have a lot of bugs.

    Let that sink in.
  • 1
    I understand, and mostly share your sentiment. I have friend who is huge Elon Musk fan, a he firmly believes that Tesla is going to release fully functional humanoid robot (Tesla Bot) that is going to replace most of human labor around the world, in the ***next year***. He's also buying Tesla stock like a crazy for that reason.
  • 1
    While you probably couldn't makes fully automatic gardening robot, you could most likely make a drone with a grabber on a wire collect objects belonging to a preconfigured set of junk, which the user can fine tune to their own garden by taking pictures of junk the robot missed with their phone.
  • 0
    Similarly, making a fully automatic robot lawyer is unrealistic, but you could probably rely on automatic analysis to sift through decades of trade records looking for suspicious patterns.
  • 2
    Both of these still require human supervision, but they enable a human to do the job in 1/10 the time, or, equivalently, to work 10x as much in the same amount of time, which means that even with an optimistic assumption of market flexibility four out of five gardeners will go hungry.
  • 1
    @Demolishun & @Co
    Please. Read the news.
    Image and thus weeds recognising fully automated weeding on industrial scale is a thing for a few years now.
    Look it up.
  • 0
    @scor But it isn't actually intelligent.
  • 0
    @Demolishun

    Yes, yes, Turing test, sentience, feelings, intelligence, jadda jadda and so on.

    Cmon.
    Why would any of such machines weed a private person's garden?
    It's just not viable.
    At all.
    Not even illegal immigrants do this job to stay afloat.
  • 1
    @scor Neural nets and pattern matching are amazing tools. But they are not AI. The problem I have with the term is it is so broad it could mean anything. Ants have better intelligence for what they encounter. Man has been using animals for highly difficult tasks for centuries.

    If we get to the point of actual AI will it be ethical to give it monotonous tasks. I don't know. Guard dogs seem to like their jobs.
  • 0
    @Demolishun
    It's ok to deny it.
  • 0
    @Demolishun
    Not even a ++ for conversation.
    Ok.
  • 0
    @scor

    "Please. Read the news."

    Why would I plus plus when you start with this condescending tone? I don't agree with what you have said.
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