32
BadFox
3y

Can anyone recommend good books for coding algorithm​s?

Any tips and tricks would also be helpful. Thanks.

Comments
  • 15
    i can't but have an upvote because asking for learning resources should be okay!? Why the fuck was this downvoted.
  • 6
    @linuxxx Thanks. Have one as well for being a good person.
  • 2
    Google search my friend (: I am also trying to find one as well so if you do happen to find a good book please request it to me (: cheers. ++
  • 4
    CLRS!!!! Introduction to algorithms. It explains certain algorithms quite well.
  • 3
    Go for CLRS if you want a reference book on algorithms.
    But If you want to learn designing algorithms you should consider The algorithm design manual by steven skiena". It goes into design process of various algorithms in a easy to read language.
    War stories in this book are also fun to read. Read more about this on goodreads.
  • 3
    The Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms
    -AHO, HOPCROFT, ULLMAN
  • 3
    Grokking Algorithms.
  • 2
    Thank you everyone. I shall try to read most if not all of these. 😊😊😊
  • 3
    The Art of Computer Programming by Donald Knuth is also one of the algorithm bibles, but it's a bit dry. I've always liked Edsger Dijkstra's publications as well.

    Going through the source of Python and Haskell libraries is also valuable, both have well maintained popular scientific and mathematical modules which can teach you a lot about data structures and how to filter, sort, reduce and transform data elegantly.

    Both have taught me a lot about detecting and abstracting common patterns from code, far beyond just standard OOP tricks.
  • 2
    Algorithms by Robert Sedgewick and Kevin Wayne
  • 2
    Third edition of Introduction to Algorithms, Cormen. Really great thick and meaty book of all your favorite algorithms and more! ISBN-13: 978-8120340077. Also there is a free PDF of it floating around online supposedly
  • 1
    Have a look at http://www.dev-books.com/ - it's a list of the top mentioned books on Stack Overflow.

    About 25% of the way through "Working Effectively with Legacy Code" here, it's made a difference to the way I code already.
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