139
v-vp
1y

Googles best javascript framework.

1st link: react is the best one.
Me: Ignore

2nd link: Angular is the best one.
Me: ignore.

.
.
.

8th link: Vue is the best one.
Me: I knew it.

Comments
  • 15
    You're like an anti-vaxxer lmao

    Selectively agreeing with search results
  • 20
  • 2
    I see you're a man of culture as well.
  • 1
    6th page 7th link: Aurelia iz da best!
  • 0
    I wonder which position jQuery was?
  • 3
    @vigidis Aurelia is quite nice to work with indeed!

    Although I am also on the Vue Band Wagon. :P
  • 1
    Your search terms are flawed to begin with. What defines the "best" framework?
  • 3
    imho, angular is a very frustrating framework, that angular app you write last two years? not a chance its gonna work without changing a lot of stuff.
  • 2
    @kamen has a good point
  • 1
    I also prefer vuejs, and also riotjs.
  • 1
    #metoo
  • 2
    Am I the only JavaScript developer out there refusing to work with a framework?
  • 2
    @Byomeer Don't you need patterns for common scenarios (state management, data binding) after some point; you'd eventually have your own framework, right?
  • 1
    @ihatecomputers He's not doing complex enough applications or he would switch a long time ago. You can't stay sane with just JS. We would complete 0 projects with just JS, today's clients are demanding.
  • 3
    @ihatecomputers most of the time i cannot even reuse classes i wrote before because the individual requirements differ so much. One project i can use much more memory to optimize for CPU usage while another time memory usage is crucial... frameworks like Vue/React/Whatever.js try to fit a broad variety of usecases. Individual optimization and tweaking seems to be a thing of the past =/
  • 1
    @DanijelH That makes sense. We're standing on the shoulders of giants...
  • 2
    @Byomeer It sounds like to me that you're creating a framework to solve a specific set of problems, which I don't opposite at all btw. It's a good choice if it's a good choice.

    I personally haven't worked on projects that required - or had the budget for - that kind of customization. I'd be scared of the documentation/maintenance burden and the increased onboarding/recruitment difficulty.
  • 2
    @ihatecomputers @DanijelH i think the biggest difference is that i work in a research environment. My client is either myself or my professor that wants to publish a paper on a specific problem.

    Maybe those frameworks are a good choice for big projects and demanding clients. Maintenance is also something i mostly do not have to care about, so i definitely see your point there.

    Nevertheless, i would really miss the optimization possibilities. Especially while working with WebGL and custom networking, like i mostly do.
  • 1
    @Byomeer Ahh, I see. I couldn't relate to anything other then what I've been exposed to, so not using a framework was totes uncharted territory (note to self, next time you accuse someone else of being narrow-minded...).

    Your kind of work sounds really cool. I love it when the code base is tailored to the problem we're trying to solve. For me, a big part of that has been deciding which of these humongous frameworks/libs is the best fit for what we're trying to accomplish... It's a hard trade-off at times. Do we pick - for our purposes, at least - the slightly bloated thing or do we pick the lean machine and build stuff on top of that? That and taking into account if new recruits are likely to be familiar with that tech, etc. 😴 Which inevitably leads to "geez, can I do some actual programming soon?" 😅
Add Comment