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MrCSharp
66d

WTF is up with open-source projects using emojis in their commit messages... FUCKING emojis..

I get it, programming is fun and a hobby to many, but can we also keep at least a minimum level of professionalism here.

WTF is a wheelchair or bento emoji at the beginning of a commit message supposed to mean? Why the hell even bother to use it in the first place? There is no fucking reason for this retarded shit.

Is this what happens when activist developers get out of their way to make programming "inclusive"?

It is your personal project and so if you want to use emojis it is OK, I respect that (not really) but I can't trust your code, your commitment, or the quality of your work if I see those dumb Unicode characters there.

Git commit messages are not a game. Be playful with comments in code or your readme.md file but git messages should be a clear reflection of the changes not what a teenager's phone vomited on the keyboard.

Comments
  • 24
    The only reason to allow commit messages with emojis is when a certain emoji fails to render and that commit solves it.
  • 10
    Wheelchair, accessibility? I'm just guessing.
  • 10
    @ihatecomputers so you see the problem with that right? You have to guess.

    Wtf is a bento ๐Ÿฑ supposed to mean then? The author was hungry when he committed that code?
  • 10
    ... or in console output. I've seen "sparkle cake sparkle" used for "all OK". By serious projects. Fuck this.
  • 3
    the one example i could think of: https://github.com/GitSquared/...

    it's annoying as shit, but at least the emoji's *somewhat* divide the commits into categories
  • 5
    Have no problem with that if the commit message is descriptive.
  • 6
    @git-gud Here the emojis actually reflect what the commits are about, so that's totally fine for me
  • 4
    But an emoji is so much shorter than to write "committy is kawaiiiiiiiiii!!!!1111", right?
  • 1
    I only really use emojis in WhatsApp because I use Hacker's Keyboard and that doesn't have any emoji functionality. Same on Desktop, haven't bothered to find out how to use emojis with a physical keyboard
  • 8
    The only emoji developers should use:

    ๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•

    ;)
  • 4
    I like it. Is there a technical reason not to use emojis?

    Alright, typing out that sentence made me cringe a bit so maybe I'll have to think this one through. Right now tho, it's pretty and it makes me happy. Commit messages can be such a bore, an image adds a bit of celebration for a job well done. I dunno.
  • 2
    @MrCSharp It would be a big problem if there wasn't more to the commit message. Some commit messages has me scratching my head even if they are free of images anyways... I'm not passionate about emoji use so whatever, I do like reading commit messages that has some flair but I can take it or leave it.
  • 1
    Emoji on the first line of a commit message seems to always look irritating to me. As a part of a longer message it should be fine.

    Emojis should not add any new information in a commit message.
  • 0
    I could think of a few uses but they certainly wouldn't include a Bento box
    โค๏ธ๐Ÿ’™๐Ÿ’š๐Ÿ’›๐Ÿงก๐Ÿ’œ for priorities
    โ™ฟ for accessibility features
    Or you could use tags like
    [P1][P2][P3] for priorities
    [A] for accessibility
    I prefer tags but meh
  • 4
    @fuck2code I much prefer having clear tags prefixing my commit message:

    https://raw.githubusercontent.com/c...

    pic from Commitizen. While I don't use the tool, a workmate introduced me to this and it is a great way to display the intention of your git commit message.
  • 3
    @darthkebab git commit -am "๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•๐Ÿ–•" && git push origin master --force
  • 1
    Even worse is using special characters in the output of some python script. As python was forced to use windows encoding, printing Unicode characters failed, making it impossible to properly use the program without patching on Windows.
  • 2
    I think I agree with you like 90% of the times.

    i agree tho with @ihatecomputers, nothing bad with celebrating once in a while, it's not like you'll become a braindead teenager if you do.

    it looks cute after all

    I think there's so much retarded people online overusing emojis that they have accidentally generated a taboo of it.

    You can enforce a good commit discipline (like you mentioned with commitizen) and whether you use emojis or not is irrelevant (as long as you don't overuse).

    The one reason I'm not too comfy about emojis in commit msgs, is because they are unicode, but everything supports them nowadays I guess...

    Next comes a bit of a weak argument: imagine scrolling through a lot of commit messages with git log oneline. A couple of emojis once in a while would make the thing easier to follow

    (but, tags also show up and separate commits into "groups", if you don't use tags well, emojis can't be a serious replacement)
  • 5
    Open source contributors are not your employees.
    If you want professional behaviour, hire them.
  • 0
    @Teknas bullshit.
  • 1
    @Teknas what a shitty comment. this is devRANT.

    we're developers, technical criticism is not restricted to hierarchical structures.

    it's not like he's an asshole going into projects that use emojis and posting insulting issues.
  • 3
    @jesustricks I'm talking about constructive contribution. If someone made a fabulous library and used emojis in commits, you can't criticise that.

    The least you can do is to be thankful for making an amazing library and making it available to the world for free.
  • 2
    @Teknas one doesn't preclude the other. This someone is free to use emojis to his/her heart's content. And I'm just as free to criticize that.

    I also object to "if you want professional behaviour, hire them". Doing something for free is no free pass and creates no obligation to be thankful.

    Now, we're talking emojis here, so I don't necessarily view this as "unprofessional". Still, as a general statement, I disagree. Depending on the level of unprofessionalism I'll ignore an "amazing library". For example, I prefer not to use systemd because of Poettering. I don't support unprofessional behaviour and that is my right.
  • 0
    @alexbrooklyn should have tried that when I ranted about the broken PR :P
  • 3
    Emoji in commits should not exist.

    That being said, I use emoji in my repo descriptions to categorize them.

    For example, tools have a wrench, robot code has a robot, data and analytics has a graph.
  • 3
    @Teknas People who use emojis in commit messages don't do fabulous libraries. Instead, they waste everyone's time by abusing Github as digital toxic landwaste so that everyone who is looking for a library to do X has to sift through their bullshit and conclude that it's not suitable. The net contribution of such OSS is therefore even negative, and everyone would be better off if they had decided to do something useful like jumping from a bridge.
  • 1
    @Fast-Nop omg, that's not 0 chill, that's like negative chill...
    bro, I'm gonna need a stove over here...

    I don't agree but I'm scared of arguing with you and getting hurt...
  • 0
    @jesustricks C ghetto rap style:

    Bitch I am chilled I've not yet killed
    Got some pointer in my magazine joined up
    They're one type of data it's 9 millimetre

    Eh yo!
  • 2
    Buckle up. It's time to lose your faith in humanity.

    https://thrangrycat.com/

    "Naming vulnerabilities using emoji sequences instead of other pronounceable natural languages have several advantages.....There is no phonetic transcription for this specific sequence of repeated emojis, and the pronunciation is open to interpretation."
  • 0
  • 0
    @qwwerty that's actually a good idea because it makes marketing wankery harder
  • 0
    A lot of projects use emojis for internal statuses on commits. Useful for automation and for the contributors to know what’s going on.

    Random emoji for emoji sake is ridiculous, but let’s not get bent out of shape, they’re just characters at the end of the day, they just happen to be more pictoral than the standard alphabet.
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