178
Comments
  • 4
    Scroll literally 2 rants up.
  • 0
  • 6
    I'm currently picking Python back up again.

    And C#.

    And angular.

    And bulma.

    And django.

    And flask (for APIs).

    And ionic.

    And others.

    All at once.

    Because this is whats required for entry level work.
  • 0
    I'm currently picking Python back up again.

    And C#.

    And angular.

    And bulma.

    And django.

    And flask (for APIs).

    And ionic.

    And others.

    All at once.

    Because this is whats required for entry level work.
  • 5
    Fullstack is such bullshit.

    Of course, as a webdev you need a foundation. I would expect most devs to have some basic familiarity with about 80% of above list. You should probably have some clue about the what/why/when, not the "how exactly".

    But "I am a fullstack dev" to me just means "junior who hasn't specialized yet", and "We have fullstack teams" means "our company isn't serious enough to organize & provide guidance to proper professional teams".

    The only universal item on that list, required for any tech position, is knowledge about Git.
  • 1
    @bittersweet

    So basically, familiarity with the list is the sort of foundation (to build on) a company expects, not necessarily expertise?

    Q - what would you say is more important, being able to demonstrate projects or algorithm knowledge?
  • 3
    @Wisecrack As a team lead, I expect all devs to know what Redis is — I don't expect them to know what the Redis command xrevrange does. They should understand what Docker is useful for, but they don't have to be able to set up compose/kubernetes configs.

    I expect that a backend dev can read JavaScript and SQL, I don't expect them to write Angular apps or set up a replication cluster.

    "Frameworks vs Algorithms" is about seniority.

    If you're 1-5 years into your dev journey, I'd say properly learn a language AND it's most popular framework(s). Thoroughly!

    Beyond that, I'd expect a dev to get curious about the inner workings of frameworks, and subsequently algorithms.

    Honestly though, we're past the point where learning the difference between mergesort and quicksort has any impact on your career.

    Whether someone shows interest in complex algorithms tells me a lot about the type of dev they are though.
  • 1
    @bittersweet

    So my weird infatuation for marching squares and applying the secretary problem to everything is a strike against me, got it.

    I need a new hobby.
  • 1
    @Wisecrack
    In 2019, there are very few devs who can build careers out of a purist theoretical approach... But it's definitely not useless, it's extracurricular activity which will indirectly help you.

    Working with frameworks and libraries, you'll eventually run into stuff that doesn't work, or underperforms for your use case — at those points, your passion for solving abstract "useless" puzzles will help you to tune the stuff under the hood of the car.
  • 2
    "Git and CI with TDD"

    but really TDD doesn't have anything to do with CI apart from "has to do with tests"

    just sayin
  • 3
    @JoseHdez2

    Also, TDD is a lie, as it depends on humans.

    Humans fail.

    I HAVE seen devs arduously write a personal project using TDD.

    But I have never seen a company with larger teams consistently build up their code through TDD, or complete a pertinacious transition towards a TDD discipline.

    TDD is one of those things which falls in the same category as "maintained documentation", "the sprint is holy" and "zero tech debt".

    We all understand the benefits, we'd all like it to be true, but "the human factor" makes it impossible to achieve at scale.

    If you want "100% unit test coverage" -- you better have a CI condition to enforce that. If you want all code to be documented, you better have a script which tests documentation coverage.

    "We should just change our habits" or "Let's help each other to enforce these code style rules" -- Lies! Big fat lies! Humans don't change.

    Any procedure not enforced by code, will eventually end up not being true.
  • 3
    @drac94 if you don't also get entire IT department's budget/salary, then you're just an exploited man with no self-respect
  • 2
    That's exactly what my company defines as a "data engineer" along with any other cloud platform and any other technology that a client asks for.

    We take all of that and add sysadmin, dB admin and big data tech to that list.
Add Comment