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I DESPISE languages that enforce a style on you because "muh community code consistency". Like ok, I understand it, but if it gets to a point where I cannot configure *MY* IDE to format *MY* code the way I want I'm gonna get pissed at you. Why does it matter to you if my project uses 2 or 4 spaces? At least give me the option to disable your fucking formatter and use my IDE's default one.

Fuck you Dart.

Comments
  • 2
    I got taken off a shortlist some years ago bcos all my code was formatted using 4 spaces rather than 2. I still use 4 spaces to format all my code.
  • 2
    I used to take a similar stance.. Working with code from others, and as part of a group really reinforces why formatting standards can be a great thing. The ability to quickly scan code to find specific components because it's all in the format you've been using, instead of how Joe Schmoe in the cube next to you does it, is a lifesaver.
  • 0
    @RevThwack I work with foreign code sometimes too, if I don't like the way it's formatted I just hit ctrl-a space real quick
  • 8
    @molaram that reformatting of others code... That's a fantastic way to totally destroy change control tracking. You check in a document going from 2 space indentation to 4, and suddenly it shows every line changing instead of just whatever small update you might have made.

    I'm not sure what your work environment is. I've worked in teams in both public and private sectors. In every job I've had, such a thing would have earned me a lecture from my supervisor and the scorn of my co-workers, at a minimum. I've seen such behavior used as part of the justification for terminating someone before.
  • 0
    @RevThwack There's no need to force people to code in a specific style. Linters exist for a reason.
  • 0
    @ItsaMeTuni Linters help you find some of your errors. Style guidelines and enforcement is there to help keep your code maintainable and understandable to others.

    If you're working alone and are sure nobody else will ever touch what you write, go ahead and use whatever format you want. If you're working as part of a team and writing something with staying power, stick to formatting and stylistic guidelines. You'll earn fewer enemies and stay employed longer.
  • 0
    @RevThwack why not plug in an automated formatter that kicks in before commits and takes care of the "problem" rather than firing someone because they spin their chair counterclockwise.
  • 1
    @molaram You think I'm taking about my personal preferences? You think you're going to find companies that are happy to change their business processes, simply because your personal preference is to ignore the coding practices they've adopted?
  • 0
    @RevThwack I might've confused linters with code formatters. I never had to use any of them since I never worked in a project with other people. Anyways, you can add code formatters to git pre-commit hooks, ensuring the repository has a specific code style. I imagine there must also be a git hook you can use to add a formatter when you pull commits.
  • 0
    @ItsaMeTuni I never argued that you can't, instead was trying to share some of the problems you'll face in the industry by ignoring coding styles and standards. Take it for what you will.
  • 0
    @RevThwack I never said I'd ignore standards. I said it's possible to work however you want and before committing an auto-formatter can apply the project's adopted style to your code.
  • 0
    @RevThwack I guess I'm just saying if people have written code that put probes outside of our solar system but some Acme Inc can't figure out a plugin that takes care of issues such as formatting then there's something off @ that company. And I'm talking strictly 2 vs 4 spaces here, there's other stuff that may definitely be worth being a nazi about. Or maybe I'm just wrong and could do with some time @ big G & Co but for the time being I have other pressing issues and no actual reason to change this aspect of my life.
  • 0
    @molaram Sounds like you've figured out a product to make... Code formatter plugin for various IDEs that will conform code to company standards prior to check-in.

    Good luck with convincing business it's their responsibility to buy such thing, rather than the responsibility of their employees to simply follow guidelines.
  • 0
    @RevThwack that's a good idea actually... conform/validate/check? or convert where possible and feasible? In fact I have a triple espresso that says Atom has this already, if by any chance someone is willing to spend 5 minutes to look it up
  • 1
    @molaram bloody hell. Probably a good thing in the long run if that's where their priorities are at
  • 0
    @M3m35terJ05h my thoughts exactly
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