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Guys may i have your opinion please.

Should i take a job opportunity seriously if they are asking me to do an AngularJS code challenge?

Taking into consideration that AngularJS became outdated or legacy few months ago.

What do you think

Comments
  • 10
  • 16
    The "professional world" doesn't (often) revolve around new technology/frameworks, on the contrary. So like @PrivateGER said, I'd also go with "yes".
  • 10
    If you are getting paid, then yes.

    Just make sure they aren't crowd sourcing ideas and code based on some challenge or Hackathon.
  • 3
    If it's a good money for you, you go get itπŸ“ˆ
  • 11
    Even though it may have gone out of fashion, companies can rarely drop an entire system and build a new one on a whim so I wouldn't worry too much about the framework itself. Just make sure they pay you.
  • 3
    Yes - the world doesn't revolve around what's hot in Silicon Valley and there are plenty of sites and webapps still running on Angular 1.x... even jQuery.
  • 2
    Depends on how much you care about using the latest and greatest stuff. Do you really need a job, any job? Are they paying you handsomely? Are you close to retirement and don't care? Are you happy that you could land another job where AngularJs skills would still be useful?

    If so, go for it. If you really value working with the latest and greatest stuff then sure, you can pass on the opportunity. But bear in mind this will make it harder to find a job (especially in an enterprise company) and competition for the role may be fiercer too.
  • 4
    Wait, wasn't angularJS deprecated a few years ago [you said months]?
  • 1
    Find out if they use AngularJS or not in the first place
  • 0
    Yo should, when it becomes legacy there will still be companies looking for angular devs and will pay better
  • 3
    @Jilano nailed it.

    If you're only working with new stuff good for you, but that's pretty rare.
  • 3
    I wouldn't, but I also have better options. If you don't, then yes.
  • 2
    Personally, I think gnawing off my right arm would be preferable to touching an AngularJS system again, but if you have worse masochistic tendencies than I, sure go ahead.
  • 3
    ok, this is such a first world problem. I seriously wish I had the option to accept or reject a job offer based on the tech the company uses
  • 0
    Microsoft Teams run on AngularJS ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 0
    @ReverendLovejoy
    It's on Angular, not AngularJS.
  • 0
    @EDragon you are from US, the birth place of tech. What makes you say that you lack opportunities to accept/reject a job?

    I'd agree if this were case with a third country.
  • 3
    @F1973
    Arizona isn't exactly a hotbed of tech jobs.
  • 2
    People > tech stack so if they’re nice people yeah
  • 1
    My companies product uses asp.net web forms... so know it could be worse
  • 0
    @SortOfTested I am talking about US entirely. It would still be a better place for tech jobs than any other country.
  • 2
    @shoogknight COBOL here.
  • 4
    @F1973
    It certainly looks that way to many people, that's why the entire world tries to get those jobs.

    We have 5M software engineering jobs at most, and compete with 2.4M extranationals physically here for those jobs, and 60-80k new ones every year.

    Geography is a thing, our land mass is more than 3x the size of india as a banana for scale. A large majority of the IT department jobs have been outsourced, and when those firms are even looking for locals, they want someone physically in that place and won't even entertain relocation assistance.

    The cost of living is so high that most people don't actually save anything; 53% of people makes $30k/year or less, so spending 20-35k USD to move a family, dropping another 2-5k on a lease deposit, for a job that could fire you for no reason isn't really feasible for most people.

    All that conspires to equal our 16% STEM graduate unemployment, and 35% underemployment.
  • 0
    @SortOfTested I get that.

    But aren't US companies paying like a lot of money as compared to other countries? (I am not comparing with India specifically).

    I have seen soooo many jobs with $90k to $150k per year salary for someone of my experience range.

    Isn't that a lot? I wonder who would be making $30k per year in IT since devs switch and can grow their salary well and other roles have decent pay.

    I understand thing with what media shows me and what I have seen on job portals.
  • 3
    @F1973
    As mentioned before, we have significantly tech unemployment, for a number of reasons. That means lots of competition. Any "skills shortage here" is a myth to enable corporate malfeasance.

    Companies like Robert half and Accenture and Apex, try to keep pay under 100k if at all possible, usually close to 65-70. Those types of jobs are the majority here. They are also contract hourly jobs that don't pay much and offer no vacation. If you're taking time off, you're not getting paid. You're also spending $12-1800/month to get benefits for your family, because they aren't provided.

    Last bit is the stalking horse/bullshit ads. You'll see a lot of jobs that show up constantly and never seem to "stay filled." They'll stick a high pricetag on it to get people applying for it, but find any reason to disqualify them so they can check the box to hire a cheap resource, routinely from overseas. They'll then actually pay $70-90.

    The tactics have evolved since this video, but the problem has only gotten worse.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch/...
  • 0
    @SortOfTested Wowowww so media and job portal showing that high salary and cool office perks are a myth and very few actually earn and live a luxurious life, eh!!!

    Which means the great american dream is a hoax.

    I'll check out that video. Thanks for eye opener reality check.
  • 0
    @SortOfTested Wowwwww! that video.. So many companies do that?

    Crazy... and then those who go from here are already neck deep in debt so my assumption is most of their earned money goes to pay off debt.

    Technically everyone is at the same level and little scratch on the shiny surface will reveal that next layer is debt and ramen.
  • 3
    @F1973 @SortOfTested this is exactly why it baffles me when people try to migrate to US... when things are that f'ed up and there are several countries around the world where things make more sense. Sure, you may not find a 100k+ a year job unless you're a senior level dev with a coveted skill set, but then again almost none of the downsides of US tech job market exist in say, the Nordics...

    Going back to the OP's question: just tackle the code challenge. What does it matter? A good exercise if nothing, and if you don't want to work with AngularJS and have other opportunities, ask about their technologies in use when in interview - they may not even use it in production (that much)
  • 2
    @100110111 This is one of the reason why I want to go to Europe
  • 2
    @F1973 yeah, having been an expat for a few occasions has lead me to appreciate societies built upon social democracy where workers' unions have a strong foothold: I gladly pay taxes for less stress.
  • 1
    @100110111 Yes. Same. I would happily pay taxes if I get benefits in return and better stress free lifestyle.
  • 1
    @F1973 what's keeping you from migrating? Family?
  • 1
    @100110111 Job offer. lol

    I had a good offer from France which got cancelled and now I am stuck at home. Trying my best to get out of the comfort zone asap.
  • 1
    @F1973 well then, best of luck to you!
  • 1
    @F1973 "Just make sure they aren't crowd sourcing ideas and code based on some challenge or Hackathon." πŸ€”πŸ€”πŸ€”πŸ€”

    interesting... and I thought it was just my instinct telling me that.... apparently it happens often?

    My last interview I had I saw their crappy react frontend code and said "oh there are so many improvements that could be made here" and the guy said "oh really? show me what you would do" and I proceeded to show a couple of things... and the interview went well (imho) and then I got a "no" afterward...

    I could have literally 5x the speed of their react code...
  • 0
    @100110111 Thanks bro. Where are you looking to migrate, if you are?

    @rodrigograca31 you would be surprised how many of those assholes do that.
  • 4
    Just chipping in my two cents from Norway (converted to USD): Starter IT jobs (straight from university) is about 30-35K a year. With some experience and changing jobs now and then something in the range of 65-85K is achievable.

    Government taxes are about 28%. Lower if you have expenses with children, medical conditions or mortgage interest since those expenses are subtracted from your taxable income.

    For this we get (free == paid for by taxes):

    - free healthcare

    - a minimum pension for free. Employers are required to chip in a minimum of 2% yearly on top of that.

    - free education up to university level / masters degree

    - Government has set a maximum allowed cost of childcare, 353$ per child per month.

    - Paid sick leave 3 days three times without requiring confirmation from a doctor.

    - Paid sick leave up to 1 year for more serious conditions. After one year the rate is adjusted to 67% of previous income.

    - Four weeks of paid vacation.
  • 2
    I still have an angular 1 app on the play store... now with more than 1 million downloads. (still maintain it) and just as the company IM interviewing tomorrow is using angular 1 in their analytics backend....
  • 1
    @F1973 I live in a country with very similar conditions to what @ReverendLovejoy describes (albeit with a lower cost of living), and actually work for a Norwegian corporation, so I have no reason to migrate at the moment, unless I get really fed up with the cold climate.
  • 0
    @100110111 woww!! that's awesome brother.
  • 0
    @ReverendLovejoy is that 4 weeks as in 30 days or 4 business weeks (20 days)?
  • 0
    @shoogknight if it's the same as here, it's 24 days (and for some weird reason, probably as a remnant from the past, Saturdays count)
  • 1
    Depends of they are wanting someone who can understand legacy to move it on eventually. If not it's a joke.

    I would say Amy company that wants to use angularjs for existing or new projects since 2 years ago is a joke.
  • 3
    @F1973 @SortofTested sorry I'm just jumping back much later, thank you for clarifying the issue @sortoftested, a lot jobs are outsourced absolutely and yes AZ and specifically the small town I live in is not a hot job market whatsoever. I've looked into some of those Co's you mentioned and aveture specifically needs people that are willing to relocate and I do not see any type of benefits to help with that.
    Also I am competing with for jobs against people that have years of experience whereas nobody I mean nobody is willing to hire (pay) someone with no experience. At least from what I've seen. You almost have to work for free to build your skills in order to eventually hope to get hired but how do pay your bills in the meantime?

    It's crazy out here
  • 3
    I just watched the video you linked @SortOfTested, Holy MF Sh*t!! that seriously proves alot and I feel slightly validated but still so mad that they are actually finding ways of skirting the law in order to avoid paying properly for the work they are requesting in order to just outsource. ugh!!!!!!!
  • 1
    @EDragon
    Yep, and there's an entire country of people who they are using as unwittingly accomplices in their endeavour to undermine our entire profession. They come here, make lower than average salary, don't get a pay raise for 6 years and drive down the pay scales on engineering jobs. Jobs many of us took on as much as $100k of education debt to obtain.

    Business majors are disgusting.
  • 0
    @shoogknight It is 4 business weeks. However, 5 weeks had become the competitive standard now and I can not think of one workplace I know of that does not provide 5 weeks (25 days) of vacation.
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