10
Ohiorenua
174d

I am so 😢🤒😡 right now. I applied for a remote job, so they gave me an assessment and the language was c++. The funny thing is that c++ was not in my resume.
So I decided to explore c++. "I don't know what the fuss is, C++ is not so hard". It was very easy for me to grasp. It took me two days to understand it.
Then I did one of those online test and I scored 58/60.
Now I went back to take the assessment test on C++ but lo and behold the assessment is now on Rest API.
But Rest API is also not on my resume. They are not assessing me on my strengths like Java or kotlin or python or my my lesser strengths like C# or JavaScript.

Comments
  • 10
    How dare they assess you in things they need and not on your strengths!

    How fucking dare they!
  • 1
    @sariel
    I know that You are been sarcastic, I am going to do a crash on Rest API now
  • 10
    Sariel is 100% correct here tho. If the company needs a person who can code in C++ and handle REST API then they will test you on that.

    You have to apply to a job that uses the skills you have. What i used to do is that i applied to multiple ones. Some even that simply just touched what i worked with before. Most of the time i would not get a call from them.

    If i did and they requested some sort of test in language like C++ (Im a C developer. Screw C++) they i would just simply say that i apologize but i must have misread the summary of the job. Cause lets be real. There is simply no F way you are getting the job after learning C++ 2 days ago against some guy or girl who has 6 years or etc under their belt in that language.

    And if by any MIRACLE you do. You will get fired in 2 weeks or less cause you wont be able to keep up in the language.

    This is not to say stop looking. Just look for job that suits your style and language choice. Dont waste time on others.
  • 5
    You know that some people joke that it takes a lifetime to fully understand C++? :)

    You needed 2 days to only understand the syntax, which is far from having useful knowledge of it. Actually knowing what you're doing is far from 2 days.

    I suggest you learn REST, because it's a basic skill to have, whenever you want to do networking. Even if you want to get hired for Kotlin/Java or C#.
  • 7
    "C++ is not that hard, I learned it in two days!"

    Oh, you sweet summer child
  • 8
    @12bitfloat everyone hard as fuck until their first segfault.
  • 1
    @WildOrangutan Same thing with many other languages. When a C++ programmer tries Python and wonders why it is slow when they program it like its C++. Python is not the fastest, but if you program it the "pythonic" way and push things to the C code it can be a lot faster.
  • 2
    idk something a professor said in my first semester was that we can pick up easily different languages if we have the logic. giving you a language you don't know that well is a good way to see how you adapt. I'm not saying that's what they intended, but it could be
  • 2
    @darksideofyay that's definitely true to some degree. A lot of languages use similar idioms. A lot of them have C-like syntax. So it's easier to pick up a similar language.

    But the thing that makes you good/employable at a specific language is knowing the ins and outs of it.

    If you know Java, you will have no idea how to manage memory in C.
    If you know Java, you will have no clue how coroutines work in Kotlin.
    And so on.

    And then there are platform specific know hows. If you know Java you won't have the slightest clue how to code for Android.

    Every language and platform comes with its own best practices.

    The thing is, you usually don't have time to learn everything on the job. If your boss gives you a deadline, you can't afford to spend half of it on google, researching basic things.
  • 1
    @Haxk20 I'm not sure Sariel is 100% correct here at all.

    We never seen the job listing, but assuming it didn't specify required languages and skills then the following is true.

    OP sent them the resume, they should've read the resume and look for their required skills. If they couldn't find C++ or Rest on the Resume they had exactly 2 options:

    a) don't contact the applicant or politely deny

    b) test them on the skills he does have to assess high level understanding and consider if he's worth training in the required skills on-site, which OP should also be informed about before he accepts the offer

    they went with option 3: Don't read the resume and test the applicant in tech he specifically said he never worked with to assess... what exactly? if he's going to waste his time on them when they couldn't even skim the resume in 30 seconds?

    Can't blame them for testing what they need, but OP can absolutely blame them for not giving a fuck. Not a good place imo
Add Comment