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So I want to install Linux (mainly bc of you guys) on my Laptop, but I don't know which one to choose. It is used mainly for coding (web and Java), Surfing and maybe 1-2 games. Any recommendations?

Comments
  • 3
    Antergos for sure its arch based so from start you have the support but when you are ready you can just do things you want .
  • 1
    Yeah, I thought about Arch/Mint as well. Will look into it, thanks
  • 1
    Here ++ get yourself an avatar
  • 1
    Ubuntu spyes on users its well known
  • 0
    Mint i'd recommend!
  • 1
    @Haxk20 Not by default anymore. It used to, yes. But this was removed as for 16.10 or 17.04 I thought :)
  • 0
    @linuxxx I doubt about it if they spied before they will spy for now too I'm 100% sure they still have some spy code in there
  • 1
    @Haxk20 Go investigate then! It's open source after all :)
  • 0
    @linuxxx yeah sure in those millions of lines haha yeah that the bullshit they say its open source so they cannot spy but who the fuck would want to go trough millions of lines of code
  • 0
    Ubuntu. It's easy to use and reliable. And don't worry about the spying thing, you can always switch later.

    I'd rather be sending some random analytic data to Amazon that slam my head against the wall for hours trying to compile a package or something. As I said, once you get good you can move on but till then it's good to get something easy
  • 0
    I'd recommend Ubuntu for Beginners as well. Don't use Mint as it has severe issues (http://techrepublic.com/article/...).

    As for the spying annoyance - if there is still anything left you can learn about it and turn it off at https://fixubuntu.com
  • 1
    I recommend arch (pure arch not antergos :D)
    This way you will learn a lot.
    But if you want something that just works use Ubuntu, mint, Debian.. Your pick.
    Every distro has its use cases
  • 1
    @ThoughtfulDev that is the way !!!!! But yeah if he is still beggining arch install might be little too much for him even with wiki
  • 1
    @Haxk20 it's not THAT hard but I get what you mean :D
  • 0
    So what specifically has Ubuntu been spying on? What are they looking for cos I've been on it for years. 😂
  • 0
    @suprano They did include amazon in the default OS search (thereby sending search requests to amazon and showing you amazon products) iirc.
  • 1
    @Haxk20 No it doesn't. Its just a bunch of people who got overexcited because Ubuntu started sending user queries in the dash to a web API for web results (which could easily be disabled in the settings). Anyone who considers that spyware should probally uninstall all web browers from their system and contact ther ISP to cancel their service immediatly.
  • 0
    @theCalcaholic oh. I don't buy anything on Amazon anyway. Lol thanks for the info though.
  • 2
    If you intend to dig into deeper stuff later I suggest an arch based distro like antergos or manjaro. If not, Ubuntu is the safest choice.

    A funny way to compare arch with ubuntu is that Ubuntu has the largest q&a userbase but Arch has the best wiki available. Thus, on could asume that Ubuntu is much more oriented for beginners and Arch is much more oriented to guys who wanna figure out stuff by themselves.

    My suggestion is you should go for an arch based os. The wiki is pure gold and the user base is big enough to find your problems already answered somewhere. If you want to customise it later, or start from scratch with your own archlinux machine, you'll be in a better position than coming from Ubuntu.

    I myself use debian for it's stability, but intend to swap it for arch when I get more time in summer. Nevertheless, I also recommend Debian.
  • 0
    For the best support: Ubuntu

    For the best UX (or if you came from Mac OS X): elementary

    Tinkering (Starter): Manjaro

    Tinkering (Intermediate/Expert): Arch

    Tinkering (Expert): Gentoo

    I would personally start with Ubuntu and just start distro hopping until you find your happy place.
  • 0
    So many choices (+_+) well I installed mint yesterday, but will also look into Arch and it's distributions. Thanks for the advice
  • 0
    @Torbuntu But do you have any indication that things have changed? The root problem was, that Mint is being developed by a team which is far too small.

    Signed sources don't improve the security of the software integration - and there are no security advisories (as stated)

    It's good to hear though, that they include the kernel in the GUI updates now - it's not nice by any means to not be informed about security critical updates.
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