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Am I the only one who hates the idea of using CMS (WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, etc) to build websites?

Comments
  • 4
    WP has its place but I know what you are saying. Good point.
  • 4
    @Jumpshot44 Yeah, wp has its "glory", but I don't like to use CMS to build websites. CMS are for content publishing or blogging. :)
  • 1
    I like WP. If all you get to do is write a blog and if you're not so good at webs WP works.
  • 2
    that is true, I remember back in the day these kind of stuff ware for those with no technical knowledge to run fan sites, blogs etc...idk why we don't have sort of a core application framework and modules that provide helper logic to ease the life of developers (sort of building blocks) and to not have to deal with the ton of crap that wp et al are offering
  • 0
    @dev-nope There are so many rapid application development (RAD) frameworks which has all building blocks for a basic website.
  • 1
    I should disclose that I have started a small project with similar to my above comment to ease the development of apps in a modular way, although in very early stage (close to definition) so any feedback is welcomed as well as are ideas.

    will be on github ideally by the end of next week. target version is PHP7 and the core is on top of Zend Expressive(psr-7)

    hit me up on daghostman.dd at gmail with everything you've got 😁
  • 4
    What is "basic website" these days? I mean, you really have to give client a chance to modify the content to keep the site dynamic. I'm not defending those cms but they get the job done most of the time.
  • 0
    @dev-nope I do not understand why are you building it. Most top MVC frameworks like Laravel, Yii2 etc help you modularize your code!
  • 4
    please don't use wordpress and drupal in the same sentence ;)
  • 0
    @qwerty1337 hahaha They are the same kind of things! :P
  • 1
    i have the same feeling as you!
  • 0
    @code-god 1) proof of concept, kinda; 2) learning experience; 3) the idea behind CMS plugins is not that bad in general, although too broadly defined. 4) combination of a few almost dead pet projects I had previously.

    Also yeah reinventing the wheel is pointless, but hey.. look hybrid, electric cars and various power plant types and various "lightweight" frameworks pop up all the time not saying it is necessary good, but different people different boats :p
  • 0
    Well I hate to work with them. But all my client seem to love the feeling of control of their own website. So I have to keep using it for simple websites. I'm using Joomla right now
  • 2
    @Sakuyu I used Joomla for 4 months. Probably I will never, ever, 3v3r, use it again. For me, it's like using Windows 95 in 2016. You have to do 7 totally unproductive steps to create a menu item, then another 5 more to "link" that menu item to show what you want in the 'content' section... Maybe it was a bad experience, or maybe Joomla is like that. :)
  • 0
    for budget websites WordPress is great. for everything else, laravel.
  • 4
    I feel cheap and dirty after using wp
  • 1
    @dev-nope I have thought about building something like that for a long time! Where can I follow the development?
  • 1
    Go Ruby ane Jekyll!
  • 0
    @devs will push in the next few days on github.. still getting some of the gears of the CLI client to work, before I make the initial push.
  • 1
    @hax0r like somebody molested you and took away your dignity.
  • 0
    @felipebhz I build my own template and backend version with already a basic menu for desktop and mobile. So I only have to change the names for the menu items. But I had the luck to learn and make it all while I was on a internship.
  • 1
    @Sakuyu I really don't like the way CMS deals with websites construction haha :) I prefer to use pure code + frameworks.
  • 0
    @felipebhz Yeah I prefer full code too but then I have to change something every time my client wants something changed, and I hate to be doing that all the time.or do you have a solution for that?
  • 2
    I prefer building out a site manually then creating a simple custom cms to maintain content in the future
  • 1
    @Sakuyu I know how you feel. Haha I don't have a better solution for that, but I prefer to change it. :)
  • 2
    I absolutely despise Wordpress...
  • 1
    @naitsabes Me too. Wordpress and the others are bloated with plugins and are know to have security flaws.
  • 2
    @Ardethian well put. Wordpress is a totally different thing from Drupal. When you try to create functionalities or customize them in Joomla and Wordpress you always end up with a monster.

    Drupal on the other hand...what a learning curve.
  • 4
    @newEntity @Ardethian I absolutely hate Wordpress. I've used it but I hate it. For one, it has way too many plugins, none of which except a handful are worth a shit, but on top of that, every good plugin knows they have you by the balls so it's $15/mo for the "pro" version. Then if you need other functionality you start realizing that it's $15/mo here then $49.99 to unlock a feature that was advertised. It just makes me sick.

    Drupal is more of a Content Management Framework and can even be used as a headless CMS for custom developers. Most modules are free, but there are some slight limitations there too.

    In the long run I always choose Drupal because I can do what I want with it.
  • 2
    I hate CMS.
  • 1
    Drupal! Love it.
  • 2
    The current generation of kids downloading templates and changing tags ...... writing 7 lines of code are culprits of this
  • 0
    @daumie I hate it when people generalize stuff and I mostly dislike people of other generations simplifying and downplaying younger generations. And I am not that really young.
  • 1
    @newEntity you must be a windows guy.....we understand.
  • 1
    @daumie you are actually spot on...mostly regarding my previous comment.
  • 3
    @Ardethian @newentity Drupal learning curve is more like an 85 degree grade uphill with a 0 degree plateau once you get the mechanics of it.
  • 5
    I use WP if I need to do a website fast in a week for a client and need money fast. Plus, in my country all the "tech companies" use WordPress to make websites for clients. I use to get pissed when they used WP to make a website for clients and all they did was use a default WP template and change the menu color to green and charge the client $10k or more.

    I recently needed money and I got a project to do for a client and I used WP and got good quick money.
  • 1
    @prodoxx how's life on the other side?
  • 0
    If you need a simple static website with no functiality other than just being informative, I don't see the issue with WordPress. I use it for my personal and business website because I don't have time to spend coding up a backend for a simple informational site. Install WP, add my theme, add my content, and don't touch it for years. I only add blog posts and portfolio items occasionally.

    Now I have more time to focus on my actual product.
  • 0
    @fyroc but, but we have markdown ... or ghost ...
  • 4
    We hated all the CMSs out there so we decided to build our own CMS, with blackjack and hookers. After nearly a year of work they killed the project in favor of Shopify. Now my days are spent fighting with their stupid documentation trying to coax the peice of shit into doing some of the most basic things, usually in the ugliest way imaginable.
  • 1
    I was thinking to be crazy. Thank you
  • 3
    I like Jekyll. Don't have to worry about all these web vulnerabilities, other than Nginx. I don't post very often, so dropping a text file and building is nothing.
  • 4
    You guys are also only seeing this at the technical level. From a business stand point I also chose WordPress for its popularity. I don't want to use a platform that requires training for my employees. I also don't want my developers to even have to touch the content. The average marketing specialist or social media specialist should have at least basic knowledge of how to post blogs, edit pages, and add portfolio items. Bam! My social media person is now in charge of keeping our business site updated with little to no training.
  • 0
    I've built a few projects recently in October CMS. It has a lot of the CMS stuff pre made whilst using Laravel under the hood, so it's really quick to build sites without the faff of Wordpress themes. Even the backend has access to a decent browser based code editor should you need it on the go, supporting syntax highlighting, code validation and emmet. Very granular UAC too, so clients can't break their sites as easily, and very easy to extend functionality as needed.
  • 1
    I hate it... but sadly, clients love it (for a good reason)
  • 0
    @prodoxx Completely understand this. still have a preference for frameworks tho.
  • 0
    @hax0r that's like saying "A Mustang GT sucks.... but I prefer tires."
  • 0
    Drupal is starting to get "off the island" so to speak. Lots of the newest development around Drupal 8 is focused on a headless approach with heavy focus on front end developers. The best way to use Drupal is to build an install profile drush script that deploys the site with all the best backend configurations already set on installation. If you're a decent developer and/or designer, you can rest assured that you have a reliable and easy to use admin area with custom UI on the front end.
  • 1
    I also use Wordpress for pretty much 98% of the work I do as a freelance developer. E-Commerce sites, social feed integration sites, subscription based websites.

    Reasons:
    1. It's familiar so it could be handed over to other developer/agency during or after completion. 2. The community & core developers keep it secure. 3. Immediate back-end available. 4. Staff training is a breeze ( content population ) 5. Super fast development.
  • 0
    I think I saw a few users mention Python/Ruby. I did a course at MITx in Python and really liked it.

    I was wondering if proponents of Python/Ruby can honestly say they can deliver a website, in about 40 hours of work. These hours should include all research, planning, scoping, environment setup ( local/stating ), development (Photoshop-to-web, responsive design), including a comprehensive CMS, live process, etc...

    Maybe it's a case of different client bases with bigger budgets and timeframes?
  • 0
    I personally love building content managed sites using Contentful or Cockpit as API-first CMS, integrated with a static site generator like Hammerformac(hammerformac.com)and continuous deployment to a build and hosting platform like Forge (getforge.com).

    When I push template changes to GitHub, build and deploy automatically.

    When content added or saved, build and deploy automatically.

    For me, makes building websites fun again
  • 0
    The decision of using a particular solution (Symfony framework, Silex micro-framework, Drupal CMS) or type of solutions (CMS or framework) should be based on project requirements.

    What I really hate is when a developer use the same solution for any type of project, once before I had to work after a developer on a user contributions web app that only lets users to sign-in using social​ account and can create posters with different colors and symbols, his solution was using WordPress and I had to stick to his choice.
  • 0
    @code-god
    All depends off your perspective I had to learn becouse where I work, hope not much time, it's project after project and I never have the change to make something from ground. And I'm studying hat the same time. So CMS have the good side.
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