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Anyone else know how to solve overheating cuz I sure as hell don't ๐Ÿ™„

Comments
  • 12
    Maybe there's lots of dust in the heat sink. You could also try changing the thermal paste
  • 0
    @electrineer Imma try that thanks.
    I'm so dumb should have done that.
  • 3
    if you do resource intensive machine learning stuff maybe rent a virtual cloud desktop which you can access via ssh. www.paperspace.com/ml
    That way your laptop stays cool.
  • 2
    @heyheni Nah most of my work is on OGL And I'm scared of off window buffers ๐Ÿ˜†
  • 7
    If you work mostly from one place (a desk), buy a cooling pad?
  • 1
    Remove Linux because it heats the shit out of your laptop for some reason
  • 2
    @shoop Linux is the only thing keeping my laptop remotely cool lol
  • 0
    @shoop It's thermals are actually better after I put linux in it.
    Thought a lite OS might help.
  • 1
    @Catastrophe

    good idea @myss

    Laptop Cooler Laptop Cooling Pad Notebook Gaming Cooler Stand with Four Fan and 2 USB Ports for 14-17inch Laptop

    https://a.aliexpress.com/_dWFzlIL
  • 1
    @heyheni Nice !
    This should work
  • 4
    @myss i second that. After cleaning your lappy's insides a bit, get a cooler pad, even cheap ones can improve your airflow and temps
  • 6
    Take the marketing sticker off!
  • 0
    @bahua That's one odd advice
    You sure ?
  • 12
    @Catastrophe

    I am sure, but it's also unrelated to your problem.
  • 3
    @shoop An OS usually does not run a machine hot. Some programs or services might. In an extremely unlikely case a driver can.
    Older Ubuntu stuff was a bit more prone to using resources (like Windows upstart starts everything on boot). Currently having issues with Spotify using a lot of CPU (even when not listening anything). On Windows I have issues with Navicat after waking up from sleep or hibernate. Those are the kind of things to look out for if you delve in the software part not some bullshit bias as Linux sucks it makes hardware run hot uninstall it it.
  • 4
    Based on my experience from my HP spectre x360, I got 4 methods, 2 software and 2 hardware.

    Software(reduce cpu power=less heat, but would reduce cpu performance)

    Use throttlestop, just turn off turbo boost.

    Undervolt your cpu, I don’t get a undervolting option in bios so I’m using intel extreme tuning utility(aka XTU) note this may not be stable so that I recommend you should do stress tests while undervolting to make sure it’s stable.

    Hardware(Airflow, heat transfer)

    Clear dust in your laptop, it’s really important as it greatly affects the airflow. There’s dust filter in my laptop so after few years of use it has not accumulated a lot dust. But for my Mac mini 2018, not having any dust filter, it have been having quite much dust just more than 1 year use.

    Replace your thermal paste, if it has gone through many years you probably should as it may be dry?(not sure) and it’d greatly improve your thermals.

    Good luck on making your laptop cool again.
  • 8
    @Catastrophe
    Taking the marketing stickers off has been proven countless of times to vastly increase the coolness of a laptop.
    These marketing stickers are also known to drag the swag of a laptop down quite a bit.
  • 0
    @Oktokolo LOL aight
    I hear ya
  • 0
    @bahua yeah @Oktokolo "explained"
    LOL
  • 3
    Liquid nitrogen.
  • 0
    @hjk101 it is funny that you took his comment seriously
  • 2
    I usually drill lots of holes in the case.

    Related link:

    https://instructables.com/id/...
  • 6
    @Nanos

    I think the same may apply to buildings..
  • 1
    @Nanos ๐Ÿคจ
  • 4
    Don't use it on bed.
  • 3
    @fnf47 some laptops take air in through the keyboard so it might not be too terrible. But if there are vents directly under the fan, as in @Nanos' wannabe-mac-pro photo, it would help to place it on a hard surface like a book.
  • 0
    @hjk101 for me Linux consumes a lot of CPU, it's constantly sitting at about 90% usage, even with nothing open, and at around 80-90° constantly. When I went back to windows it was only this much usage on startup
  • 2
    @electrineer

    You could always drill holes in your book too. :-)

    Actually, I only do that when I want to fit them in a ring binder !
  • 0
    @Nanos

    What is it with technical manuals..

    First print, comes in a ring binder.

    Second print, doesn't..
  • 4
    @Nanos Man, your dedication to holes puts @rutee07 to shame.
  • 3
    @Lor-inc

    I reckon my next vehicle design will include lots of holes !

    At least in software wind tunnel tests, holes improve aerodynamics.

    So, might end up a bit like this:
  • 3
    @shoop way to generalize an entire OS from that one data point
    Why not try to figure out what's causing the 80-90% usage instead?
  • 2
    @Nanos I hope trypophobic people don't stumble upon your creations
  • 1
    @asgs he was serious, as you can see in his recent comment. He probably did not mean to tick me off. I always get triggered people yelling to throw away an entire setup because there is a minor issue and a huge opinion. One does not easily switch OS. Or entire stack.

    Look if something is clearly being abused in a situation that is never going to work good I get that you can recommend the obvious alternative. Based on facts. He could have said (although wrongfully so) "Linux is not designed to be resource friendly. For laptops and systems with limited airflow you need something like Windows."
  • 1
    Clean out all the trash or get a cooling pad.
  • 1
    I'm reminded of a laptop I have here, which was only cheap because of, lets call it a design flaw, if you run the CPU above 80%, it gets too hot.

    I have a vague memory that some recentish windows 10 update killed the ability to set the CPU max to 80%..

    Someplace I have a picture here of some earlier handi-work where overheating was really a problem, so I took it all apart, and drilled a lot of holes.

    Like, everywhere you could drill a hole, I drilled a hole..

    It looked like a Swiss Cheese !

    But it never overheated after that. :-)

    But that was extreme.. (As such, I can't find an example easily via google images of anyone else who went quite so overboard..)
  • 0
    @RememberMe I could not be bothered, most of the stuff I tried was not informative enough so I decided to just go with windows
  • 0
    @shoop then why not just leave it at that, that you never bothered learning it? I mean, I'm not a huge fan of desktop Linux either but there are ways to do pretty much everything on it.
  • 1
    @PublicByte @RememberMe fair
  • 1
    @pythonInRelay no it's an asus but to be fair ambient temperatures where I live could be as high as 40 degrees at times
  • 2
    First things first: despite what the name infers, avoid using it on your lap..or any kind of fabric.. it just covers the vents (more than it should) and butchers the air flow..

    If placed on desk or any other hard surface (also avoid plastic) still causes overheating, check for dust..
    If still not good, check if all the vents are properly running and try to figure out what is causing the overheating..

    Maybe get a docking station with coolers or some simpler cooling pad if you have the option or build one yourself..maybe use an inverted wired document tray if you have one, just make sure there is no insulation on wires that might stick to the laptop..
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