8
djsumdog
52d

I hate the word "Proactive"

What does that even mean? You add the prefix pro- to the word "active" and you get the same thing! Why not just say active?!

We're talking an active approach

We're taking a proactive approach

See, they mean the same thing and the first version doesn't make you sound like a douche.

Comments
  • 16
    Proactive is taking actions before shit happens.

    Reactive is taking actions after shit happens.

    Active is just taking actions.
  • 2
    @sweetnothings Damn. That was fucking eloquent
  • 0
    @nitwhiz > Proactive is taking actions before shit happens.

    That would be preactive, not proactive.
  • 4
    Is preactive even a word?
  • 2
    @AmyShackles thanks, never heard it either.
  • 4
    That’s fucking fake ass bullshit buzzword those dumb asshole managers use to decline your raise really
  • 4
    When @sweetnothings takes you to school and hits you on the way out!
  • 1
    If you want to sound ahead of the issue because you already know you made a half-baked program with errors but don't want to tell that to the client...use proactive

    But if you aren't scared to tell the client honestly that the program is shit...use active
  • 1
    My boss says being proactive in projects is bad for business (don't fix/improve stuff before the client asks for help).
    But I find this mentality rather stupud. If you absolutely fucking know that something will definitwly break soon, then why not tell or act on it?
    To me this is like intentionally acting more stupid than you actually are...
  • 2
    @PonySlaystation if it's not in scope with the requirements and it will just add hours to people's work which could affect project timeline or on-going service delivery, then this is a possible point not to do it.

    If it's not in scope of work, you are not obligated to do it and making changes not in scope can sometimes open a can worms if done incorrectly. What is written in the contract protects both parties so it's better not to go beyond the in scope requirements.

    Also doing work as a freebie isn't good business wise. The company should also earn to pay you well.

    However mitigation of risks to deliver in scope requirements that can affect project timeline or on-going service delivery should be part of the pro-active approach (ie rearrange tasks due to holidays and leaves, change part of code to be more efficient, etc)

    In short, be pro-active if it is scope of the requirements, create a new contract and bill if it is not.
  • 2
    @iamai You are absolutely right. These arguments are the reason why I am not a businessman. ๐Ÿ˜„
  • 1
    @PonySlaystation if you see a valid change needed that may require a contract change or additional resource to be added you could maybe help build the proof of concept or estimate on what is needed so the company can bill. Then ask for a raise :)
  • 0
    @imai She the kinda ai we fuckin need in future
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