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webketje
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Poll: how do you manage Git?
A) CLI
B) GUI

My answer: A
Tally: A:1 B:0

Comments
  • 1
    Mostly cli.
  • 5
    A:2,75, B:0.25
  • 1
    I like gitext, and kraken. Avoid sourcetree on windows/linux.
    cli on server.

    the way I work is really non standard. code on desktop, compile and run somewhere else.
  • 2
    Bit o both.
  • 14
    I think this tally system is susceptible to race conditions
  • 0
    where would you put intellij's git integration, gui or cli
  • 1
    @alexbrooklyn maybe we can use git to version control the tallies
  • 0
    Actually I do use one element of GUI but run it from the CLI: gitk; so only to view the branch structures & diffs
  • 2
    @prodigy214 GUI unless you only use the terminal window in intelij (not really got integration than is it)

    So I use the CLI a lot in the intelij terminal but also some hotkeys, git log and merge from intelij's git integration. So like most use both.
  • 0
    Primarily CLI, but occasionally VS Code
  • 1
    @ScriptCoded Now I'm confused. I didn't considered VSCode a Git GUI.
  • 1
    @c3r38r170 oh with GitLens it has excellent Git support :)
  • 0
    Command line.

    Any GUIs I've used(source-tree, kraken) feel like they hide what I'm doing.
  • 1
    @ScriptCoded What about just the default support? Does it count as GUI if it barely abstracts the commands?
    I know it does but in that case GUI vs CLI is just buttons vs writing. (And you still have to write in the GUI)
  • 0
    Both, depends on shell
  • 1
    @c3r38r170 Well, code gives you the ability to commit, pull, push, auto fetch, change and create branches. Under menus you also find most other things such as stashing. It also has a built in diff viewer and merge conflict interface and resolver. And then of course you can access everything through the command palette, and even though it's still typing it's a lot easier than searching through a CLI, especially for someone who's not used to a CLI. So yes, I'd call it a UI
  • 2
    I just use the power of thought!

    "where's that change? "

    "I thought I committed it"
  • 2
    In reality I use the cli with a shit load of aliases

    git co
    git ci

    etc..
  • 1
    GUI because of multiple repos with shared nested submodules. SmartGit has great UI for that (but sucks in some other areas)

    Also I like clicking things more than making typos
  • 1
    bit of both. for new commits i just use CLI cause it's faster, if i wanna check the tree i use gitkraken
  • 1
    I do really like to use Sourcetree!
    So tally me up for GUI.

    If I'm on Linux I mostly use the git tool in vscode and sometimes `gitui`
  • 0
    Magit for Emacs.
  • 1
    Kind of hard to update the tally guys, gotta decode all these custom replies. You could've just said A) number B) number :D
  • 2
    Integrated for the simplest of tasks, CLI otherwise.
  • 1
    A: 0.85, B: 0.15

    Only because I use the “Update” button in GitHub to get my branch up to date with master when I have a PR already in code review because I’ve defaulted my pull behavior to rebase and it makes my coworkers want to strangle me/cry when I rebase after they’ve started CR.
  • 0
    @c3r38r170 why not you do clickerty click and stuff happens in the repo
  • 0
    Commit, push, pull I use the IDE for purely because I have shortcuts set up to make it quicker than typing the same stuff in the terminal.

    Switching branches, merging, rebasing, bisecting, etc. I do from the terminal for the same reason - it's generally quicker to type it than point and click in some dialog somewhere.
  • 1
    I use vim-fugitive, so IDE commands to manage git. and also another plugin that helps me easily move between gutters (edited parts of the code)
  • 0
  • 0
    CLI only.
    I have several git GUI tools and I hate every single one of them.
  • 1
    @nibor Same.

    gco=“git checkout”
    gf=“git fetch”
    gm=git merge”
    gcp=“git cherry-pick”
    etc.

    I also have custom commands like “git new-branch” that switches to master, pulls, and creates the new branch from that. Or “git merge-master” that switches to master, pulls, switches back, and merges it in, with all the requisite error handling.

    Hell, I even use git’s verb scheme for my apt aliases.

    apt-fetch=“apt update”
    apt-diff=“apt list --upgradable”
    apt-pull=“apt upgrade”
    etc.
  • 0
    Cli. Because git GUI like source tree lags my laptop.
  • 0
    @nibor company like emotiv is going to hire you after reading this.
  • 0
    for pulling, committing, pushing: the jetbrains integration, but purely by hotkeys.

    for everything else - everything that requires my brain to be active: CLI.
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