68
wicho
6y

I don't understand those who only use terminal for everything...

Comments
  • 9
    200MHz and 24MB in 2001? Weren't those low end specs back in the day?
  • 0
    @milkbytes I tought the same...
  • 1
    @thureos I believe my first computer (bought when XP launched) had a 1.2GHz AMD Athlon XP and 128MB (or 256MB, not sure) of RAM
  • 8
    Looks like someone doesn't understand the power of cli then...
  • 1
    @ScribeOfGoD I do understand it, but there are lot of things that you can do faster on a GUI.
  • 2
    @thureos and then there are a lot of shit thing to use with a gui. Like a server OS
  • 14
    hail the power of terminal!
  • 1
    @ScribeOfGoD For the record... I will never install a DE on a Linux Server. Never ever!!
  • 4
    @thureos I'm not being facetious here. What would be faster? Given you already know the commands on both sides, I have trouble seeing where a GUI would be advantageous.
    GUI gives choices, user friendliness, and a lot of sub menus with buttons, but faster than cli? At what?
  • 1
    @Synth-Synapses at working with 3d, for example. I want to see you standing in front of a cli to model a nice model! Basically it _is_ possible. But there is a reason why tough developers create shortcuts like gui for that. For most other tasks I prefer cli of course. Creating well formatted files documents in vim for latex, coding, basically everything else.
  • 0
    @Synth-Synapses "Given you already know commands on both sides" - that is the issue with console tools - it takes a lot of time to learn it. With GUI tools you can start using it immediately on a basic level, and even advanced things are usually fast to learn (usually rather discover). Don't get me wrong, I am using console tools a lot, but there are things in which console tools are way worse - look at IntelliJ IDEA - I don't know about better IDE than this (GUI or console one). There are IDEs for a console, but everything I tried so far looked like toys compared to IDEA (e.g. type aware autocompletion, refactoring, quick doc, quick implementation, support for many languages out of the box or on a few clicks (I am programming in JavaScript, TypeScript, Scala, Java and Haskell), support for multiple languages in one file, built-in VCS support and so on).
  • 3
    @sirjofri

    I just got a 3d printer and have found it much easier to use OpenSCAD (a tool where you build 3d models programmatically with a script) far easier and quicker than using FreeCad (parametric mouse based GUI application).

    It's far quicker to code my model in VIM and then only launch a GUI to view it.

    I tend to favor CLI for most things as my main interface into my computer these days seems to be SSH from my phone.

    It all depends on what you're doing I agree, but it also depends on your own knowledge, if you don't know how to do it faster in the CLI then a GUI is probably faster until you learn (if you want to learn).
  • 1
    @querellaMMXII I believe you that it is easier to create models programmatically if that clean look is what you want. But I'm sure that models created for creative purposes are easier to create with a gui. Especially if you want high level detail with 500,000 faces or more with true displacement and bumps. Then I would really prefer a good gui. And I must say blender really has a great gui. The shortcuts seem to be a bit like in vim. To me it is very intuitive.
  • 0
    @querellaMMXII but openscad... I will definitely have a look into it.
  • 1
    @sirjofri

    That's exactly what I mean though.

    Right tool for the right job.

    We could all sit here all day coming up with examples but someone else will always have an example of the opposite.
  • 2
    Casually brings pop corn. Let the fights begin!
  • 2
    Its just preference, its OK if you dont get it tbh
  • 2
    I like command line because I can automate tasks (click build button, stop JBoss Server, open the JBoss folder over SFTP, put the new version, start JBoss) with just one command (ok, I made a script, but it's just one command) and use the time of clicking buttons to something useful (like reading devRant)...
  • 1
    It's so that the nerdiest of the species can feel like special snowflakes.
  • 1
    @milkbytes 8GB in 2017 is mid range at best.
  • 0
    In the future we all have standing desks? Oh hell no
  • 3
    @monnef I'm not debating why GUI exists and is useful though, I'm debating optimization. Of course GUI has it's place. I'm not one of those CLI zealots that wish everyone went CLI once and for all. But given most tasks, it's just more efficient. Learning curve isn't in play here. It takes a lot of time to learn your favorite IDE.

    @sirjofri I hadn't thought of that at all, but you're so right. Everything that has to do with graphics is of course way better on a GUI. I would hate to see a gimp CLI. :P

    @NOPSledRider Come on dude, stop trolling -_-

    @urco Viva la (standing desk) revolucion!
  • 2
    It's about the experience, the terminal feels different, you feel more in control, you can do whatever you want whenever you want.
  • 0
    So instead you suggest it's more effective && sophisticated to visually navigate through nested GUI components to perform a task that could be executed with a single call from CLI?
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