54

List of commands that will destroy your Linux system.

BEWARE! THESE COMMANDS WILL GREATLY HARM YOUR LINUX DEVICE! I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGE DONE ON YOUR DEVICE! I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE IF YOU CANT GET YOUR DEVICE TO WORK AGAIN!

- sudo rm -rf /*
- mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda
- cowsay hello there >> dev/sda
- :(){:|:&};:
- rm -f /bin/su
- rm -f /usr/bin/sudo
- cd /etc;echo hello | tee *

Comments
  • 2
    I dont understand why is echo here?
    Can you explain the brackiet command as well pls?
  • 13
  • 4
    @Gregozor2121 JK. Don't actually. It goes to /etc/ and overwrites all files with hello
  • 4
    @Gregozor2121 the "brackier" command is a fork bomb
  • 0
  • 15
    Shouldn’t this be a “Linux Starter Pack”?
  • 17
    Pro tip: To make these commands fun rather than horrifyingly terrible.

    Execute these WITHIN A VM!
  • 7
    Sudo is not included by default in debian thou...
  • 0
    @Linux It is 🤔
  • 0
    @HampusMa and what is a fork bomb?
  • 2
    @vhoyer forkbombs are infinite self replicating functions that eat up cpu and ram until the system crashes.

    I don’t advise “testing” it
  • 0
    @C0D4 why? Wouldn't after restarting the computer things get back to normal?
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1
    For windows users:
    :S
    start
    goto S

    Write it in notepad and save as .bat
    have fun!
  • 0
    Might have to try this in a moby? GOING WHALE HUNTING
  • 2
    @RantSomeWhere i prefer to overwrite sda with cowsay
  • 0
    📌
  • 1
    Delete the sudo file is not so dangerous, sudo ils basicly a package so you'll just need to reinstall it (i think 🤔)
  • 1
    @enzop but you'll get access denied. And you cant get root access without su/sudo
  • 1
    @HampusMa
    su and sudo is not the same package.
    Removing sudo is fine.
  • 1
    @Linux i didnt say it was the same package
  • 3
    @HampusMa
    What you are saying is wrong, a linuxbox is not depending on sudo, su is another story.
  • 2
    @Linux for a not that expirienced user it will still be a PITA to not have sudo. As most tutorials usually need it.
  • 1
    @Wack
    Just su in as root and install sudo, or just remove sudo from the commands that the supposed tutorial tells the user to use.
  • 1
    @Linux sure, but what if you're on ubuntu where afaik the root login is dissabled by default?
  • 3
    @Gregozor2121 %0|%0 for windows
  • 1
    @Wack
    You can su to root :) ssh login is disabled by default
  • 0
  • 0
    sudo pwn > /dev/human
  • 1
    Why not mass kill:

    ansible -b -i $hostsFile all -a "dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sda"
  • 3
    That reminds me that in first year in my school, we got classes about Unix commands, and the teacher talked about sudo rm -rf * and how dangerous it was.

    The thing is, since we have the lessons printed and the teacher said that we don't need to attend his classes, only the exam, some did not attend classes and surely expected that the printed lessons was enough (not really ofc)

    Before exam, while we were testing the commands, one asked "what does sudo rm -rf * ?"

    We grinned and jokingly said "go on, try it." We thought that it was obvious we were joking.

    It wasn't that obvious apparently.
  • 1
    @Linux you cannot su to root by default in Ubuntu. The root account is locked.

    You can just reboot into a recovery console and set a root password if you remove sudo however.
  • 1
    @iguana
    Is that new then? 14.04 you can atleast.
  • 0
    sudo rm-rf / --no-preserve-root
  • 2
    sudo chmod -R 000 /*

    ... for when you want to have everything intact but not be able to access them.
  • 2
    @Linux @linuxxx why has it always been installed by default on my Debian systems then? 🤔

    I cannot recall ever having installed sudo manually.

    EDIT: Ohhh, it could be this:

    "This is a side-effect of installation parameters. If you specify a root password during installation sudo is not installed by default. If you do not specify a root password, sudo is installed."

    I never supply a root password so that it's locked 🤔
  • 1
    @Meta Ohhh, I always supply a root password... makes sense now!
  • 1
    @Meta
    Yeah same, because I consider it more secure to have different passwords.
  • 0
    @HampusMa even if you log in as root?
  • 1
  • 0
    Give access everywhere.
    chmod -R 777 /
    Sounds not so bad but try login afterwards
  • 1
    @Linux no, been that way for a long time. Still is that way. You must have set a root password.
  • 0
    Maybe it's the oppositional defiant in me but I kinda wanna try these bad boys now
  • 0
  • 0
    Ex openssh require some security of keys and such. With 777 everywhere all kinds of security issues will trigger and leave a very bad system.
  • 0
    An ideaI had today, that reminded me of this - create a Bash script and call it "Sepukku.sh" (Shepukku?)... basically a nuke script. :)
Add Comment