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A typical free WiFi here in Italy. What the fuck I'm supposed to do with this?!

Comments
  • 29
    Still better than no FREE Wifi...
    I don't see your problem.
  • 9
    What part of italy do you live in!? I can't even perform speedchecks
  • 4
    @Awlex I'm on vacation in Tuscany
  • 10
    Go to starbucks, they have a free wifi
  • 16
    @devTea Luckily, LUCKILY, we don't have one here
  • 2
    @PonySlaystation you're maybe right, but it should be advertised as a P2P network seeing its capabilities to connect to the outer world..
  • 5
    @Gianlu I'm a bit more in the north. (alto adige/ south tirol) barely no free open wifi, unless somebody doesn't know how to set uo wpa. And if you find one... Well
  • 7
    @Gianlu I guess you hate them huh, lol

    It’s overpriced a little and I actually met someone who is trying really hard to buy one just to look cool smh
  • 10
    @devTea At the local italian tabachi (kiosk / coffee bar) you get for 1 Euro way better coffee than you would ever get at starbucks. And you can expect a joke and a friendly chat with the bar owner. That's the reason Starbucks will never succeed outside of tourist places like the milan dom in italy.
  • 5
    @heyheni You read my mind
  • 7
    @jschmold no, it isn't. Not by Italian standards, anyway.
    Besides, I remember reading that the main reason why there were no Starbucks in Italy (until recently) is because the owners were actually trying to recreate (some of) the original atmosphere of italian bars
  • 6
    @jschmold starbucks failed in Australia because the Italian immigrants had brought their superior coffee culture with them.

    https://youtu.be/_FGUkxn5kZQ
    🎥 Why Starbucks Failed In Australia | CNBC
  • 2
    @endor If that's the case, then some of them owners should have quit their job instead
  • 1
    @Awlex well, more of a source of inspiration really, not actually having something identical. Now *that* would have been dumb
  • 4
    Starbucks : Coffee :: JavaScript : Java
  • 10
    Solution:
    1. Turn off WiFi
    2. Use mobile data when outside of home

    Also I never thought I'd be able to post this one but...

    It's insecure and you certainly don't want to be in the same network as I am while you're checking your email 😈
  • 3
    @Condor I always thought WPA2 and a secure connection was enough... Never going to connect to a public WiFi network again!!
  • 8
    @Gianlu In home networks where the key is only shared with those you trust on the network, it most certainly is. But in public Wi-Fi where the password is readily available, nothing stops an attacker from logging into it and plucking all the packets from the air (by putting their network card in promiscuous mode and decrypting the packets using the Wi-Fi password), or by even actively putting themselves as a man in the middle. This usually causes some red flags in the browser but hey, most users don't care and click through anyway. This MITM attack that I'm talking about is most commonly done in the form of ARP poisoning and DNS cache spoofing.
  • 7
    That said, a trustworthy VPN (for which I've created my own servers) can prevent these attacks to some extent. I'd still prefer my mobile data whenever possible though :)
  • 6
    @Condor Very helpful lesson, everyone should know more about this stuff. Starbucks is a gold mine for someone who wants to steal some sensible information.
  • 9
    @Gianlu you betcha 3:) if I wasn't a white hat, I'd totally plant a weaponized Raspberry Pi with some strong AF WiFi transceiver in places like Antwerp Central Station's Starbucks :3
  • 6
    I hear unlimited 4G "roaming" across the EU has gotten cheaper and cheaper.

    Must be very good for travelers too :)
  • 2
    @MrJimmy surprisingly, I've found a few that didn't require all that crap. Just a name and an email address. Very uncommon, though
  • 3
    @MrJimmy yeah, luckily my beach has a private WiFi of which the password is written on a sticky post at the bar. The WHOLE beach WiFi requires the phone number, uses the phone MAC and is shit, it can't load a website successfully.
  • 4
    @karelian even better: nowadays, you can use your regular national plan in all EU countries at no additional charge.
    So if you have a number in, say, Spain, you can travel in all other EU countries and still use all your minutes/sms/data without any extra charges, as if you were still in Spain
  • 1
    It's usable. As someone who grew up with dial-up, I wouldn't complain about it.
  • 3
    >MBps

    half a megaBYTE per second? could be worse. could be that number of megaBITS per second.
  • 4
    Fast enough for chatting and devrant.
  • 2
    You could fax a complaint to their head office 😂
  • 1
    That's enough for everything, except videos, videogaming and download big files. I don't see your problem, what do you expect by something you don't pay for?

    Ps. Yes, it's right, Italy has a problem with free wifi caused by the law, that wants the offerers to check the identity of everyone connected. But nothing about speed
  • 2
    @Condor but, but my emails are encoded in Base64 so you can’t obviously read them!

    *someone kills me please*
  • 4
    A typical paid WiFi here in Italy.
  • 2
    That's double my internet connection at home 🤔
  • 3
  • 0
    Umm just watch porno
  • 0
    Can do quite a lot :3

    I have survived personally and professionally on below 0.3Mb/s

    You just grow a little bit faster than certain parts of the globe.
  • 0
    @Condor I don't think you can break the encryption if you only know the password of a router. WPA uses a 4-way handshake to generate the actual encryption.
  • 0
    That really shows me how I got used to fast internet. Some years ago I had 0.6MB/s (I think we're talking about MByte) and it was fucking fast because before I had 0.25MB/s and this was pretty standard back then (I remember we were able to play online games with this pretty fine).
    Today I get angry when it's that slow.
  • 1
    We have free WiFi in train stations. Apparently Google blessed us with those. Guess what? Your 0.6MBps is x times faster. x probably greater than a 32 bit number. Can't even fucking open a webpage with that. And they have the audacity to collect phone numbers while signing up.

    No thanks! I'll let my mobile network provider Snoop on me.
  • 0
    I can hardly get 80 kb/s speed on my uni wifi. Wtf I'm supposed to do on this
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