90
Owenvii
3y

The company I work for...
Has:

1. No CI/CD
2. SVN instead of GIT
3. Outsourcing to India (oof)
4. No Automated Testing
5. Uses Bugnet (ancient, outdated)
6. No clearly defined code standards
7. No real documentation on the code
8. Rubbish code
9. No desire to reduce technical debt
10. Poorly maintained DB
11. Poor outdated equipment
12. A useless PM
13. Still priotizes IE support (??)

On a scale of 1 to 10 how fucked is this company and anything they develop?

Comments
  • 85
    -2147483648

    Rating system didn't pass QA but went to prod anyway
  • 6
  • 5
  • 10
    Get out
    Now
  • 7
    So room for improvement that you can bring to the table and be highly appreciated?
  • 2
    @jareish well
    Im the junior
    😕
  • 5
    @jareish make no mistake.. Im not lacking in initiative. If I could, I would walk up to the table and amaze people with the new technology we could use that would make our life easier.

    But we.. We can't. We're bound by a government contract to continue working on features and improvements and we can't stop to change the technology or systems we are using.

    And not only that but i have no authority. And the company is failing, people have recieved working hour cuts. A full 8-hour day from their paycheck. A sinking ship..
  • 3
    Some of that is forgivable on it's own or maybe 3/10 but.... I would not be surprised if they also had a mainframe and used COBOL somewhere or runs a portion of the business on an old Apple II
  • 5
    oof^∞

    gtfo at the speed light,
    or until you have another job secured
  • 2
  • 7
    Sounds like most companies that have been around for longer than 10years 🤷‍♂️
  • 1
    @Treighton they don't adapt with current technology..?
  • 2
  • 2
    @Owenvii bigger older companies with bigger older codebases take a lot longer to adapt.
  • 4
    @Owenvii it’s not always that people don’t know about the new stuff, but that it does not make sense from a business perspective to completely change processes in place or refactor a complete code base.

    It’s a tough pill to swallow but that’s what legacy projects are like. It’s our job as developers to be able to learn, adapt, and do the best we can with what we are given.

    Think of it this way: if you can learn to make this project work with all of these hindrances l, imagine what you’ll be able to do with the latest and greatest tech.
  • 3
    I got that the company is not good but why point 3 is an oof?
  • 1
    @chowdercake because its not outsourced to good developers over there.. But rather bad ones.

    Also even if it was good developers the timezone difference makes it difficult to work with them.
  • 2
    On a scale from 1 to 10 of how fucked you are. You are probably a purple.
  • 3
    Do we work at the same company?
  • 2
    @katbreitin I was thinking exactly the same thing, and yet I'm pretty sure we're not collegues :-)
  • 2
  • 4
    You know the industry crazy when the situation at many services companies here is turning into:
    1. No CI/CD
    2. SVN instead of GIT
    3. Outsourcing to Phillipines (oof)
    4. No Automated Testing
    5. Elaborate bugfix meetings which are basically free pizza and gossip
    6. No clearly defined code standards
    7. No real documentation on the code
    8. Rubbish code
    9. No desire to reduce technical debt
    10. Poorly maintained DB
    11. Poor outdated equipment
    12. A useless PM
    13. Doesn't give two shits about Firefox
  • 1
    @Owenvii sounds like my company.

    I've told (rather practically screamed) on my entire floor in front of my director and the Line Manager that shit is screwed.

    Line manager didn't bat an eye, fucker only knows how to browse Amazon and ask My manager "did we solve all the bugs/why not/when can we release"

    Director is more bothered about making deliveries happen as well, doesn't want to afford any screw ups. Hence, there are 4 developers working with legacy code, 3 testers doing a completely manual validation of each of the functionality and our CI is... Well semi-decent to say the most. CD does not exist.
  • 1
    Even working on a old system you could add an abstraction layer. For instance if you work with an old SOAP or telnet client, build a rest api on top of it and let the other systems use that api
  • 2
  • 1
    10.1
  • 1
    I can’t stand companies outsourcing software.... it’s the most stupidest thing ever for the product... I spent years as a consultant, fixing software that was outsourced... when you outsource the people don’t have the passion for the product.. and only write code that fulfills defined requirements.. no scalability, no modularity, rarely commented.. poorly architected just complete shit code.. that barely functions.

    Yes one could say a consultant is outsourced but I was a consultant on site. I meetings, understood the product and business goals.

    The other thing is when they outsource software to India, literally is worse than outsourcing to another native company.. but outsourcing to another country for fucken software is just dumb.. those people don’t give two shits about the code
  • 1
    @M1sf3t Absolutely. Sounds like my current organization. With the government as the customer pretty much anything they want is done regardless of whether it makes good or safe engineering sense.
  • 0
    Run!
  • 0
    That makes me feel a lot better a about my job. Thanks!
  • 0
    "This one goes to 11."
  • 0
  • 0
    This is just called legacy.

    Sure there seems to be room for improvement, but somehow reading devRant gives me the expression that every younger dev things that most of the applications are made with newest techs. Wake up :)
  • 1
    @Senior I'd say outsourcing to India is not legacy at all and probably one of the worst points on the list.
  • 0
    @saucyatom It is pretty common for older applications to be outsourced at some point and it has been seemingly cheap to outsource to India. Not a good trend though as the true costs are a lot more though as the efficiency is poor.
  • 0
    @Senior sounds like something for the plumbing type of legacy development. Keep it alive by adding some spaghetti here and there until it all falls apart. I don't know anyone who would like to work on that anyway..
  • 0
    @saucyatom Not necessarily, but might still be the case. If you work in the biz for over 15 years and attend to all sorts of projects, you will see all kinds of solutions.

    My actual point (with no offense) was that every one should not expect every old working production application to be ported to newest or even newer platforms and mindsets.

    If you look at a house built at the 70's, tou cant expect it to be built with current standards.
  • 1
    @Senior The software I work on has been built in the 90s, so I certainly know what you mean. Until this year some parts have still been edited in COBOL! Fortunately it is very modular and I don't have to touch those too often, just sometimes when there is an error found in a legacy module someone has to sift through a generated C# file containing a single 6000-character spaghetti class with beautiful variable name like "s_a_13". Then you pray that it doesn't interact with another class to do some magic (database changes) there, which causes the first class to change its behavior. I should stop here or I'll get nightmares again.
  • 0
    @saucyatom
    Sounds somewhat familiar :D
  • 0
    @jareish this could backfire as you would cement the legacy systems
  • 0
    No. 12 is universal.
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